Page 1 of 1

Decision making in critical positions in chess

PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2016 6:11 pm
by johncenaa
HOW TO IDENTIFY CRITICAL POSITIONS IN CHESS AND MAKE THE RIGHT DECISIONS

by
IM Sagar Shah and myself (GM Igor Smirnov)

Image

Let me start off with a conversation I had with an experienced Grandmaster friend of mine a few days ago.

Me: According to you, what is a critical position?

GM friend: It is a position where you need to spend a good amount of time in order to make an important decision during a game.

Me: Ok. You’ve told me what to do during a critical position, but what about how to recognize whether or not it is a critical position?

GM friend: (after a long time thinking) I think a player can understand whether or not it is a critical position, based on his feel and understanding of the game.

Me: But then, how do you explain whether or not it is a critical position to players who do not have a highly developed understanding of the game like you?

GM friend: (again, after a long period of thought!) I don’t really know!! :)

The above conversation sparks off a few very interesting points about critical positions, the first being that a critical position is one where you must put in a lot of thought and make an important decision; second, great players, thanks to their endless hours of chess practice, have developed a feel for what a critical position is.

But for mere mortals who are taking their initial steps in the game of chess, it is important to understand what exactly a critical position is.

Why is a critical position so important? :doh: :doh:

CLICK HERE TO READ THE COMPLETE ARTICLE!! :dance: :dance:

Re: Decision making in critical positions in chess

PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2016 6:25 pm
by johncenaa
In the first part of this article, we discussed what we should do in a critical position and how to stop your opponent’s idea. If you missed it, I strongly recommend you to read it here, and only then continue with this second part, so that you won’t break the continuity but will DIGEST this lesson fully. :)

In the second part, we’ll address a much more important question:

Image

Prophylactic thinking is a key tool in critical positions. But one need not always prevent the opponent from executing his plan. Sometimes you can create a threat that is stronger than the opponent’s idea.

To make this point clearly, let us see a most interesting position from the 2013 World Championship match between Viswanathan Anand and Magnus Carlsen.

Anand – Carlsen WC Match 2013
Image
anand vs carlsenWhat should Black do?

Now you know that whenever you see a position, the first question that should come into your mind is this: What is my opponent’s idea?

We answer this by “giving the move to our opponent”. If it were White’s turn, he would simply play 27.Rf4! b2 28.Rh4 b1=Q 29.Nf1 and no power in this world could prevent mate on h7.

READ MORE AND LEARN FROM THE GAME NOW!!:dance: :dance: