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Games annotated by Fischer

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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Sat Oct 08, 2011 11:33 am

Re: Games annotated by Fischer

Game 11
[Event "Herceg Novi blitz"]
[Site "Herceg Novi blitz"]
[Date "1970.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Viktor Korchnoi"]
[Black "Robert James Fischer"]
[ECO "E97"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "62"]

1. d4 {Notes by Bobby Fischer} Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4
d6 5. Be2 O-O 6. Nf3 e5 7. O-O Nc6 8. d5 Ne7 9. Nd2 {This move
is apparently considered best by the Russians. In the "Turner
Mira" 1970, Petrosian played 9 b4 Nh5 10 Nd2!? Nf4 11 a4, but
without great success against Gligoric.} c5 {I think this is a
logical move. Black takes a tempo from his King side play to
slow down White's Queen side initiative which usually comes
quite quickly with b4, c5, etc.} 10. a3 Ne8 11. b4 b6 12. Rb1
f5 {! Having made all the necessary precautions on the Queen's
side Black is now ready to attack on the King's flank.} 13. f3
{Maybe better is 13 Nb3 as in the game Gligoric-Tringov,
Belgrade, 1969.} f4 14. a4 g5 15. a5 Rf6 {!} 16. bxc5 {? This
is, as Korchnoi pointed out afterwards, a "terrible mistake"
because now it is impossible for White to get any initiative
on the Queen side.} bxc5 17. Nb3 Rg6 18. Bd2 Nf6 {or ...h5!}
19. Kh1 g4 {Maybe more exact was 19...h5} 20. fxg4 {Forced
because of the threat of 20...g3 and then white cannot play 21
h3 because of 21...Bxh3 etc.} Nxg4 21. Rf3 {? 21 Bf3! was
better, with a more tenacious defence..} Rh6 22. h3 Ng6
23. Kg1 Nf6 24. Be1 Nh8 {!! This attacking manouver is
decisive.} 25. Rd3 Nf7 26. Bf3 {h4!? held out a little
longer.} Ng5 27. Qe2 Rg6 28. Kf1 {Or 28 Kh2 Qd7 threatens
29...Nxh3 etc.} Nxh3 29. gxh3 Bxh3+ 30. Kf2 {At this moment my
hand hovered over White's Pawn on e4, but at the last second I
realized that 30...Nxe4 is answered by 31 Qxe4 and White
wins.} Ng4+ 31. Bxg4 Bxg4 {And here Korchnoi thought for about
a minute and a half and not seeing a defence to the double
threat of 31...Bxe2 and 32...Qh4+ resigned.} 0-1
Up's & Down's are everywhere but have full faith on yourself "you are a good player "
<<

forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Sat Oct 08, 2011 11:34 am

Re: Games annotated by Fischer

Game 12
[Event "Herceg Novi blitz"]
[Site "Herceg Novi blitz"]
[Date "1970.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Petrosian"]
[Black "Robert James Fischer"]
[ECO "E77"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "84"]

1. c4 {Notes by Bobby Fischer} Nf6 2. Nc3 g6 3. d4 d6 4. e4
Bg7 5. Bd3 {This is not the best move, but Petrosian did not
like to play blitz games according to the analyses. He left
the analyses for the tournament games.} c5 6. d5 O-O 7. Nge2
e6 8. Bg5 {Uhlman used to be fond of this system many years
ago.} h6 {!} 9. Bd2 {More consistent was 10 Bh4.} Nbd7 10. b3
{With b3 White weakens the diagonal a1-h8, If 10 f4 e5! 11 f5
gxf5 12 exf5 e4! with good play for Black.} exd5 11. cxd5 a6
12. O-O b5 13. f4 {? a bad move.} c4 {!} 14. bxc4 Nc5 15. Bc2
{15 Qc2 is better, when Black has compensation for the Pawn.}
b4 16. e5 {!} dxe5 17. fxe5 Ng4 18. Na4 Nxa4 19. Bxa4 Bxe5
{White has no hope.} 20. Bf4 Qb6+ {Black threatens on both
sides.} 21. Kh1 Bxa1 {Better is 21...Bxf4 22 Rxf4 Nf2+ winning
easily} 22. Qxa1 Nf2+ {?! 22...g5 is better, this way White
has got a chance.} 23. Rxf2 Qxf2 24. Bxh6 f6 25. Bxf8 Kxf8
26. Ng1 Bg4 {? A bad move because after h3 the bishop has to
move back.} 27. Qb1 {h3 was also sharp.} Kg7 28. h3 Bf5
29. Qxb4 Ra7 30. Bd1 Qxa2 31. Bf3 a5 32. Qc5 Rb7 33. d6 Rb1
34. d7 Bxd7 35. Qe7+ Kh6 36. Qxd7 {!??} Qf2 { White could make
a draw with Qf8+ or Qf6.} 37. Kh2 Qxg1+ 38. Kg3 Qe1+ 39. Kh2
Qe5+ 40. g3 Rb2+ 41. Bg2 Qe4 42. Qd5 Rxg2+ 0-1
Up's & Down's are everywhere but have full faith on yourself "you are a good player "
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Sat Oct 08, 2011 11:34 am

Re: Games annotated by Fischer

Game 13
[Event "Herceg Novi blitz"]
[Site "Herceg Novi blitz"]
[Date "1970.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Samuel Reshevsky"]
[Black "Robert James Fischer"]
[ECO "E92"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "94"]

1. d4 {Notes by Bobby Fischer} Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4
O-O 5. Be2 d6 6. Nf3 e5 7. Be3 {!? Reshevsky likes this
flexible system.} c6 {7...Qe7 is the sharpest here. A game
Gligoric-Fischer, Monaco 1967 continued 8 d5 Ne8 9 h4 f5 10 h5
f4 11Bd2 g5 12h6 Bf6, etc.} 8. O-O Ng4 9. Bg5 f6 {or 9...Qb6
10 h3! exd4? 11 Na4!} 10. Bc1 f5 11. h3 exd4 12. Nxd4 Ne5
13. exf5 gxf5 14. f4 Qb6 {!?} 15. Be3 {! or 15 Kh1 Nf7
equalizes, (not 15...Nxc4?? Bc4+ or 15...Ng4?? 16 Nxf5 Nf2+ 17
Rxf2 Qxf2 18 Be3} Ng6 {? After this move Black is busted. More
enterprising was 15...Qxb2! 16 Na4 Qa3 17 Bc1 Qg3 18 fxe5 Bxe5
19 Rf3 Qh2+ 20 Kf2 Nd7 with play.} 16. Nxf5 Qxb2 17. Nxg7 Qxc3
18. Bd4 Qa5 19. Bg4 {Simple but effective, 19 c5 was snappier
though.} Na6 20. Bxc8 Raxc8 21. Qg4 {! White's threats are
proliferating chiefly 22 Qe6+, but other less brutal moves
like 22 Ne6 or Nh5 or 22 f5 were not pretty tp
contemplate. Also the fact that Reshevsky had a good 3.5 to 4
minutes to polish me off was not to pleasing. I decided here
to opt for the endgame.} Rc7 22. Ne6 {22 f5 was more aggresive
keeping the Queens.} Qf5 {!} 23. Nxf8 {Of course more
aggressive was 23 Qxf5 Rxf5 24 g4.} Qxg4 24. hxg4 Nxf8 25. f5
{25 Bxa7 was easier, ie 25...b5 26 Bb6 Rb7 27 cxb5 Rxb6 28
bxa6 Rxa6 29 a4 Ra5 30 Rc1 c5 31 Rb1 etc.} c5 26. Bc3 Rd7
27. Rad1 Nc7 28. Rfe1 Kf7 29. Re3 b5 30. Red3 {Ba5!} bxc4
31. Rxd6 Rxd6 32. Rxd6 Nb5 33. Rf6+ Ke7 34. Rc6 {?? As
Reshevsky pointed out immediately after the game 34 Ba1! c3
Rc6! Nd7 36 Re6+ Kf7 37 Re1 won.} Nxc3 35. Rxc5 Nxa2 36. Rxc4
Nd7 37. Ra4 Nc3 38. Rxa7 Ne4 39. Kh2 Kd6 40. Kh3 Ndf6 41. Kh4
h6 {!} 42. Rg7 Ke5 43. Rg6 Kf4 44. g3+ Kf3 45. Rxh6 Nxg4
46. Rg6 Nxg3 47. Rxg4 {And here Reshevsky proposed a draw and
I accepted.} 1/2-1/2
Up's & Down's are everywhere but have full faith on yourself "you are a good player "
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Sat Oct 08, 2011 11:34 am

Re: Games annotated by Fischer

Game 14
[Event "US Ch."]
[Site "-"]
[Date "1963.12.18"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "3"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Robert Eugene Byrne"]
[Black "Robert James Fischer"]
[ECO "E60"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "42"]

1. d4 {Notes from various sources.} Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. g3 c6
4. Bg2 d5 5. cxd5 {5.Qb3 maintains more tension. -- Fischer}
cxd5 6. Nc3 Bg7 7. e3 O-O 8. Nge2 Nc6 9. O-O b6 10. b3 {It's
hard for either side to introduce an imbalance into this
essentially symmetrical variation. Deadeye equality also
ensues afer 10.Nf4 e6 11.b3 Ba6 12.Re1 Rc8 13.Ba3 Re8 14.Rc1
(Stahlberg-Flohr, Kemeri 1937) -- Fischer} Ba6 11. Ba3 {After
White's 11th move I should adjudicate his position as slightly
superior, and at worst completely safe. To turn this into a
mating position in eleven more moves is more witchcraft than
chess! Quite honestly, I do not see the man who can stop Bobby
at this time. -- K.F. Kirby, South African Chess Quarterly}
Re8 12. Qd2 e5 {! I was a bit worried about weakening my QP,
but felt that the tremendous activity obtained by my minor
pieces would permit White no time to exploit it. 12...e6 would
probably lead to a draw. -- Fischer} 13. dxe5 Nxe5 14. Rfd1
{"Add another to those melancholy case histories entitled: The
Wrong Rook." -- Fischer ~ "This is very much a case of 'the
wrong rook'. One can understand Byrne's desire to break the
pin on the e2-knight, but this turns out to be less important
than other considerations. Fischer spends a lot of time and
energy analysing the superior 14. Rad1!, but still comes to
the conclusion that Black can keep the advantage." -- John
Nunn} Nd3 {Now it's all systems go for the Fischer rocket. --
Robert Wade} 15. Qc2 {There is hardly any other defense to the
threat of ...Ne4. -- Fischer} Nxf2 {! The key to Black's
previous play. The complete justification for this sac does
not become apparent until White resigns! -- Fischer} 16. Kxf2
Ng4+ 17. Kg1 Nxe3 18. Qd2 {Byrne: As I sat pondering why
Fischer would choose such a line, because it was so obviously
lost for Black, there suddenly comes...} Nxg2 {!! This
dazzling move came as the shocker... the culminating
combination is of such depth that, even at the very moment at
which I resigned, both grandmasters who were commenting on the
play for the spectators in a separate room believed I had a
won game! -- Robert Byrne} 19. Kxg2 d4 {!} 20. Nxd4 Bb7+ {The
King is at Black's mercy. -- Fischer} 21. Kf1 {In a room set
aside for commentaries on the games in progress, two
grandmasters were stating, for the benefit of the spectators,
that Byrne had a won game. Byrne's reply to Fischer's next
move must have been jaw dropping! -- Wade} Qd7 {And White
resigns. Fischer writes: "A bitter disappointment. I'd hoped
for 22.Qf2 Qh3+ 23.Kg1 Re1+!! 24.Rxe1 Bxd4 with mate to follow
shortly."} 0-1
Up's & Down's are everywhere but have full faith on yourself "you are a good player "
<<

forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Sat Oct 08, 2011 11:35 am

Re: Games annotated by Fischer

Game 15
[Event "Stockholm Interzonal"]
[Site "Stockholm Interzonal"]
[Date "1962.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Robert James Fischer"]
[Black "Julio Bolbochan"]
[ECO "B90"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "74"]

1.e4 {Notes by Bobby Fischer} c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6
5.Nc3 a6 6.h3 Nc6 7.g4 Nxd4 8.Qxd4 e5 9.Qd3 Be7 {More accurate
is 9...B-K3 immediately.--Fischer} 10.g5 Nd7 11.Be3 Nc5 12.Qd2
Be6 13.O-O-O O-O 14.f3 Rc8 15.Kb1 {Amateurs are often puzzled
by this apparent loss of time. Actually it is a handy
defensive move, getting out of the pin on the QB-file which
could become annoying after ...P-QN4-5. One never knows when
lightning will strike! -- Fischer} Nd7 16.h4 b5 17.Bh3 Bxh3
18.Rxh3 Nb6 19.Bxb6 Qxb6 20.Nd5 {White has a strategically won
game; his Knight cannot be dislodged. -- Fischer} Qd8 21.f4
exf4 22.Qxf4 Qd7 23.Qf5 Rcd8 24.Ra3 Qa7 25.Rc3 g6 26.Qg4 Qd7
27.Qf3 Qe6 28.Rc7 Rde8 29.Nf4 Qe5 30.Rd5 Qh8 31.a3 h6 32.gxh6
Qxh6 33.h5 Bg5 34.hxg6 fxg6 35.Qb3 {The coup de
grace.--Fischer} Rxf4 36.Re5+ Kf8 37.Rxe8+ {Black
resigns. After 37...KxR; 38 Q-K6+, K-B1; 39 Q-B8+
mates.--Fischer} 1-0
Up's & Down's are everywhere but have full faith on yourself "you are a good player "
<<

forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Sat Oct 08, 2011 11:35 am

Re: Games annotated by Fischer

Game 17
[Event "Varna Olympiad Final"]
[Site "-"]
[Date "1962.10.04"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "7"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Wolfgang Unzicker"]
[Black "Robert James Fischer"]
[ECO "B92"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "52"]


1. e4 {Notes by Bobby Fischer} c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4
Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be2 {On and off, White resorts to this solid
and still respected system (championed by Smyslov) whenever
the sharper tries fail.} e5 {Black's expectation in this
Najdorf Variation is that his control of important central
squares, with possibilities of Q-side expansion, will more
than compensate for the slight weakness of his backward QP.}
7. Nb3 Be6 {To provoke f4-5 weakening White's KP.} 8. O-O Nbd7
9. f4 Qc7 10. f5 Bc4 11. a4 {To hinder ...b5.} Be7 {Better
than 11...Rc8 12 a5 Be7 13 Bxc4 Qxc4 14 Ra4 Qc7 15 Be3 h6 16
Rf2 with a bind. (Schmid-Evans, Varna 1962)} 12. Be3 O-O
13. a5 {A critical alternative is 13 g4 d5! 14 exd5 (if 14 g5
d4! or 14 Nxd5 Nxd5 15 exd5 Nf6 16 d6? Bxd6 17 Bxc4 Qxc4 18
Qxd6? Qxg4+ 19 Kh1 Qe4+), Bb4 15 g5 Bxc3 16 gxf6 Bxb2 17 fxg7
Rfd8 18 Rb1 Bc3. White's Pawns are overextended and his King
is exposed.} b5 {Too passive is 13...h6 14 g4 Nh7 15 Bf2
followed by h4.} 14. axb6 Nxb6 15. Bxb6 {? At Curacao 1962,
Geller had found the right line : 15 Kh1! Rfc8 16 Bxb6 Qxb6 17
Bxc4 Rxc4 18 Qe2 Rb4 19 Ra2! and Black is hard-pressed to
defend his a-pawn, but 19...h6! 20 Rfa1 Bf8 21 Rxa6 Rxa6 22
Rxa6 Qb7 23 Na5 Qc7 24 Nb3 Qb7 (Zuckerman)=.} Qxb6+ 16. Kh1
Bb5 {! Intending ...Bc6 followed by a5.} 17. Bxb5 {White has
alredy dissipated his theoretical advantage. He should settle
for 17 Nxb5 axb5 18 Qd3 with opposite colored Bishops.} axb5
18. Nd5 Nxd5 19. Qxd5 Ra4 {! Avoids conceding the a-file and
puts pressure on the KP.} 20. c3 Qa6 21. h3 {It's hard for
White to hit upon a constructive plan. At Curacao 1962, Tal
played against me 21 Rad1 Rc8 22 Nc1 b4 23 Nd3!? (White's in a
bad way anyhow) bxc3 24 bxc3 and now ...Rxc3 (instead of my
...Ra5 lemon) wins outright. If 25 Nxe5 dxe5 26 Qxe5 (Qd8+
Bf8!) Bb4! 27 Qxc3 Qxf1+! (Kmoch).} Rc8 22. Rfe1 h6 {! A handy
'luft', as becomes apparent later.} 23. Kh2 Bg5 24. g3 {?
Creating more K-side weaknesses. Better is 24 Rad1.} Qa7
25. Kg2 Ra2 26. Kf1 {What else? On 26 Rxa2 Qxa2 27 Re2 Rxc3!
Now Black has a decisive shot.} Rxc3 {! On 27 Rxa2 (27 bxc3
Qf2 mate) Rf3+ 28 Ke2 Rf2+ 29 Kd3 Qxa2 30 Ra1 Qxb2
wins. Black's first rank is no longer vulnerable since the
King can escape to h7 on the check.} 0-1
Up's & Down's are everywhere but have full faith on yourself "you are a good player "
<<

forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Sat Oct 08, 2011 11:35 am

Re: Games annotated by Fischer

Game 18
[Event "It Bled"]
[Site "It Bled"]
[Date "1961.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Petrosian"]
[Black "Ludek Pachman"]
[ECO "A04"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "42"]

1.Nf3 c5 2.g3 Nc6 3.Bg2 g6 4.O-O Bg7 5.d3 e6 6.e4 Nge7 7.Re1
O-O 8.e5 d6 9.exd6 Qxd6 10.Nbd2 Qc7 11.Nb3 Nd4 12.Bf4 Qb6
13.Ne5 Nxb3 14.Nc4 {Very nice tempo move. --Fischer} Qb5
15.axb3 a5 16.Bd6 Bf6 17.Qf3 Kg7 18.Re4 {Now Petrosian is
preparing for a very beautiful finish.--Fischer} Rd8 19.Qxf6+
Kxf6 20.Be5+ Kg5 21.Bg7 {This is a real problem
move. --Fischer} 1-0
Up's & Down's are everywhere but have full faith on yourself "you are a good player "
<<

forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Sat Oct 08, 2011 11:36 am

Re: Games annotated by Fischer

Game 18
[Event "Ch World (match)"]
[Site "New York (USA)"]
[Date "1886.01.20"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "19"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Johannes Zukertort"]
[Black "Wilhelm Steinitz"]
[ECO "D53"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "58"]

1. d4 {Notes by Robert James Fischer from a television
interview. } d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. Nf3 O-O
6. c5 {White plays a mistake already; he should just play e3,
naturally.--Fischer} b6 7. b4 bxc5 8. dxc5 a5 9. a3 {Now he
plays this fantastic move; it's the winning move. -- Fischer}
d4 {He can't take with the knight, because of axb4.--Fischer}
10. Bxf6 gxf6 11. Na4 e5 {This kingside weakness is nothing;
the center is easily winning.--Fischer} 12. b5 Be6 13. g3 c6
14. bxc6 Nxc6 15. Bg2 Rb8 {Threatening Bb3.--Fischer} 16. Qc1
d3 17. e3 e4 18. Nd2 f5 19. O-O Re8 {A very modern move; a
quiet positional move. The rook is doing nothing now, but
later...--Fischer} 20. f3 {To break up the center, it's his
only chance.--Fischer} Nd4 21. exd4 Qxd4+ 22. Kh1 e3 23. Nc3
Bf6 24. Ndb1 d2 25. Qc2 Bb3 26. Qxf5 d1=Q 27. Nxd1 Bxd1
28. Nc3 e2 29. Raxd1 Qxc3 0-1
Up's & Down's are everywhere but have full faith on yourself "you are a good player "
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