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Games annotated by lasker

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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:02 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

Game 61
[Event "04, St.Petersburg"]
[Site "04, St.Petersburg"]
[Date "1909.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Abraham Speyer"]
[Black "Rudolf Spielmann"]
[ECO "D02"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "61"]

1. d4 {Notes by Lasker.} d5 2. Nf3 c5 3. dxc5 e6 4. e4 Bxc5
5. exd5 exd5 6. Bb5+ Nc6 7. O-O Nf6 8. Bg5 Be6 9. Nc3 O-O
10. Ne2 {So far White has kept up the pressure on Black's
d-pawn, but now he relaxes; he might have gone on, for
instance with Ba4-b3.} h6 11. Bh4 Be7 12. c3 Qb6 13. Qa4 Ne4
14. Bxe7 Nxe7 15. Ned4 {White does not play 15.Bd3 on account
of 15...Qxb2 16.Bxe4 dxe4 17.Qxe4 Bd5 18.Qxe7 Rfe8 with clear
advantage for Black, since the c-pawn is difficult to defend.}
Ng6 {The reply to 15...a6 would be Qa3.} 16. Qc2 Nf4 17. Rfe1
Rac8 18. Rad1 Bg4 19. Bf1 Qg6 {Overlooking the strength of
White's next move. If he had played Rfe8 first, he would have
retained his advantage. As it is, he accomplishes nothing more
than a general exchange.} 20. Ne5 Bxd1 21. Nxg6 Bxc2 22. Ne7+
Kh8 23. Nxc8 Bd3 24. Ne7 Bxf1 25. Rxf1 Re8 26. Nef5 Nd2
27. Rd1 Nc4 28. b3 Nb2 29. Rb1 Nbd3 30. Ne3 Rc8 31. g3 1/2-1/2
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:02 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

Game 62
[Event "St.Petersburg"]
[Site "St.Petersburg"]
[Date "1909.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "18"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Carl Schlechter"]
[Black "Znosko-Borovsky"]
[ECO "C41"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "37"]

1. e4 {Notes by Lasker.} e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nd7 4. Bc4 c6
5. c3 {Here immediate attack is advisable: 5.Ng5 Nh6 6.f4 Be7
7.Nf3.} Be7 {A gross blunder, as the sequel shows. Ngf6 must
be played first.} 6. Qb3 Ngf6 7. Bxf7+ Kf8 8. Ng5 Nb6 9. dxe5
Nfd5 {If 9...dxe5 10.Bg6 Nfd5 11.Nf7.} 10. Ne6+ Bxe6 11. Bxe6
Nc7 12. O-O d5 {Thus he perishes without fight. It was better
to make sure of one pawn by dxe5. After 13.f4 Bc5+ 14.Kh1 Qd3
he would still be able to develop his forces.} 13. exd5 cxd5
14. Bh3 Bc5 15. Nd2 Qe7 16. Nf3 Ne6 17. Qb5 a6 18. Qd3 Re8
19. b4 1-0
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:03 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

Game 63
[Event "St. Petersburg (Russia)"]
[Site "It"]
[Date "1909.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "3"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Vladimir Nenarokov"]
[Black "Jacques Mieses"]
[ECO "D32"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "82"]

1.d4 {Notes by Lasker.} d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c5 4.e3 Nf6 5.Nf3
cxd4 6.exd4 dxc4 7.Bxc4 a6 8.O-O b5 9.Bd3 Bb7 10.Qe2 Nc6
11.Rd1 Be7 12.Bg5 O-O 13.Rac1 Rc8 14.Bb1 Nb4 15.Ne5 Nbd5
16.Qd2 Nxc3 17.Rxc3 Rxc3 18.Qxc3 Ne4 {By this move Black frees
himself from all pressure.} 19.Bxe4 Bxe4 20.Bxe7 Qxe7 21.b4
Qg5 22.f3 Bd5 23.a3 h5 24.Nd7 Rd8 25.Nc5 Rd6 26.Qd2 Qg6 27.Qf2
Ba8 28.Nd3 Qf6 29.Rc1 {Obviously a miscalculation. Black now
obtains the superior position.} Rxd4 30.Rc8+ Rd8 31.Rxd8+ Qxd8
32.Qe3 Bd5 33.Qd4 Qg5 34.Qf4 Qg6 35.Qe3 Bc4 36.Ne1 Qb1 37.h4
Qb2 38.Kh2 Bb3 39.Nd3 Qc3 {Now White cannot in any way, get
the Knight out of the pin.} 40.Qe4 Bd5 41.Qe3 Bc4 0-1
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:04 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

Game 64
[Event "01, St.Petersburg"]
[Site "01, St.Petersburg"]
[Date "1909.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Rudolf Spielmann"]
[Black "Georg Salwe"]
[ECO "C66"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "61"]

1. e4 e5 {Notes by Lasker.} 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O d6
5. d4 Bd7 6. Nc3 Be7 7. Re1 exd4 8. Nxd4 O-O 9. Bxc6 {This
exchange leads to nothing, except, perhaps, that it prevents
Black from exchanging both Knight and Bishop. This however,
need not be feared.} bxc6 10. b3 Re8 11. Bb2 Bf8 12. Qd3 g6
13. Nde2 {This strategical manouver is altogether wrong. White
might, at this juncture, play Rad1, and answer Bg7 with
f4. Though the pawns at e4 and f4 are then exposed to attacks,
yet they are not weak, and assist in maintaining the balance
of position.} Bg7 14. Ng3 {Since Black already has moved the
pawn to g6, the Knight is not favorably posted on this
square.} h5 {A splendid strategical idea. From this
insignificant beginning Black obtains a strong pressure on the
King's side.} 15. Rad1 h4 16. Nf1 Nh5 17. Bc1 Be5 18. Ne2 g5
19. g3 Qf6 20. Qe3 g4 21. Nd2 d5 {If Black had played Be6
here, White would have been at a loss what to do. If,
perchance, Rf1, to prepare f4, Black replies Kh8, and the
advance of the f-pawn would then only open the lines for
Black's Rooks and Bishops. If 22.Qd3, then d5; 23.Qa6? Bc8. In
any case, White would have been in a precarious position.}
22. Nc4 {By exchanging one of the two Bishops, White frees his
game, and now forces the draw, with correct judgement of the
situation.} hxg3 23. fxg3 Qg6 24. Nxe5 Rxe5 25. Nf4 Nxf4
26. Qxf4 Rae8 27. Bb2 Rxe4 28. Rxe4 Qxe4 29. Qg5+ Qg6 30. Qh4
Qh7 31. Qg5+ 1/2-1/2
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:04 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

Game 65
[Event "02, St Petersburg"]
[Site "02, St Petersburg"]
[Date "1909.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Savielly Tartakower"]
[Black "Rudolf Spielmann"]
[ECO "D00"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "74"]

1. d4 {Notes by Lasker.} d5 2. Bf4 Nf6 3. e3 e6 4. Nf3 Bd6
5. Bd3 Bxf4 6. exf4 Qd6 7. Qd2 c5 8. dxc5 Qxc5 9. O-O Nc6
10. c3 {Nc3 followed by the development of the Rooks, would be
sounder play.} O-O 11. b4 Qb6 12. a4 a6 {The purpose of this
move is not clear. The advance of White,s a and b-pawns can do
Black no harm. 12.Rd8, followed by Bd7 and Rac8, was
indicated. The Bishop could afterwards take up a waiting
position at e8.} 13. a5 Qc7 14. Re1 Rb8 {An ingenious idea;
but it is questionable whether the slower attack Bd7, Rac8,
Qd6 followed by doubling the Rooks on the c-file, or by d4,
would not have been more useful.} 15. Ne5 b6 16. axb6 Rxb6
17. Qe2 d4 18. b5 axb5 19. Bxb5 Nxe5 20. fxe5 Nd5 21. cxd4 {It
appears risky to accept the sacrifice. After 21.c4, White
would have captured the d-pawn sooner or later, without
exposing himself to any danger, and he would, moreover, have
had the chance, slight though it be, of the passed pawn.} Nf4
22. Qe4 Nh3+ 23. gxh3 Rxb5 24. Na3 Rb3 25. Rac1 Qd7 {Intending
to play Qd5; but it was of the greatest importance to compel
the Knight to move, lest the White Rook take possession of the
third row and reach the square g3. Black could win as follows
25...Qe7 26. Nc4 (26.Qc2 threatening Qxc8 ...Qg5+ 27.Kf1 Ba6+
28.Nc4 Rxh3 and wins.) Bb7 27.Qf4 Rf3 28.Qd2 Qh4 threatening
now Qxh3, e.g. 29.Nd6 Bd5 30.Rc3 Qxh3 31.Re1e3 Ra8 -This
analysis is given by Spielmann and E. Cohn.} 26. Re3 Bb7
27. Qf4 Qd5 28. f3 f6 {In spite of the strenght of Black,s
position there is no decisive manouver; for instance 28...Rc8
would fail on account of 29.Rxc8+ Bxc8 30.Nc2 followed soon by
Ne1.} 29. Rc5 g5 30. Rxd5 gxf4 31. Rxb3 Bxd5 32. Rc3 fxe5
33. dxe5 Rf5 34. Nc4 Rh5 35. Kg2 Rg5+ 36. Kf2 Rh5 37. Kg2 Rg5+
1/2-1/2
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:05 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

Game 66
[Event "Prague"]
[Site "Prague"]
[Date "1908.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Geza Maroczy"]
[Black "Akiba Rubinstein"]
[ECO "C01"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "73"]

1.e4 {Notes by Dr. Emanuel Lasker and Carl Schlechter.} e6
2.d4 d5 3.exd5 exd5 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Bd3 Bd6 6.O-O O-O 7.Bg5 Bg4
8.Nc3 c6 9.h3 Bh5 {Schlechter: Black allows 10.g4 with the
hope that this will give him winning chances. The simple
9...Bxf3 10.Qxf3 Nbd7 11.Ne2 Qb6 leads to equality.} 10.g4 Bg6
11.Ne5 Be7 {Schlechter: Here 11...Nbd7!? comes into
consideration; for example, 12.f4 Qb6, or 12.Nxd7 Qxd7 13.Bxf6
gxf6 14.f4 Bxd3 15.Qxd3 Kh8.} 12.f4 Bxd3 13.Qxd3 Nbd7 {?!
Lasker: Black should play 13...Ne4. After the text move, White
achieves an advantage.} 14.Rae1 Re8 15.Re2 Nxe5 16.fxe5 Nd7
17.Bc1 {!} Nf8 18.Nd1 c5 19.c3 Rc8 {? Schlechter: Better was
19...cxd4. White must capture with the pawn, and Black can
take control of the open c-file.} 20.Be3 cxd4 21.Bxd4 Bc5
22.Ne3 Ng6 23.Qf5 Rc7 24.Rfe1 {! Schlechter: But not 24.Bxc5?
Rxe5 25.Qf2 Rxc5 26.Qxf7+ Kh8 and Black stands well (27.Nf5?
Rc7).} Bb6 25.Bxb6 axb6 26.Nc2 Rce7 27.Nd4 Qb8 28.Nf3 f6 {?!}
29.exf6 {!} Qg3+ {? Schlechter: Here 29...Rxe2!? comes into
consideration: 30.f7+ Kh8 31.fxe8=Q+ Rxe8 32.Rxe8+ Qxe8 33.Kf2
Qc6, or 33.Qxd5 Qe3+ 34.Kf1 Qc1+, etc.} 30.Kf1 {? Lasker:
Instead 30.Kh1! Qxh3+ 31.Nh2 gives White the advantage.} Qxh3+
31.Kf2 Rxe2+ 32.Rxe2 Rxe2+ 33.Kxe2 gxf6 34.Qxd5+ Kg7
{Schlechter: Or 34...Kf8 35.Qd8+ Kg7 36.Qc7+ Kf8 37.Qb8+ and
38.Qxb7+, with play similar to the game.} 35.Qxb7+ Kh6 {?
Schlechter: Losing immediately. Rubinstein overlooked the
following combination. The black king had to return to f8.}
36.g5+ {!} fxg5 37.Qxh7+ 1-0
Up's & Down's are everywhere but have full faith on yourself "you are a good player "
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:05 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

Game 67
[Event "Lodz"]
[Site "Lodz"]
[Date "1908.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Akiba Rubinstein"]
[Black "Georg Salwe"]
[ECO "D33"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "76"]

1.d4 {Notes by Lasker} d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c5 4.cxd5 exd5 5.Nf3
Nf6 6.g3 Nc6 7.Bg2 {Already this mode of developing the Bishop
is determined by the weakness of Black on d5.} cxd4 8.Nxd4 Qb6
9.Nxc6 bxc6 10.O-O Be7 11.Na4 {White concentrates on c5 and
c6.} Qb5 12.Be3 O-O 13.Rc1 Bg4 {Black should rather
strenghthen c6 by Bd7.} 14.f3 Be6 15.Bc5 Rfe8 16.Rf2 Nd7
17.Bxe7 Rxe7 18.Qd4 Ree8 19.Bf1 Rec8 20.e3 Qb7 21.Nc5 Nxc5
22.Rxc5 {Now c5 is gained and the Pawn at c6 fixed; that Pawn
therefore becomes the target.} Rc7 23.Rfc2 Qb6 24.b4 {White
threatens b5. Black has no time for 24...Bd7. The sequence is
25.b5 Rac8 26.Qc3 and Black cannot liberate himself. Again if
24...Bd7 25.b5 Rcc8 26.bxc6 Bxc6 27.Qc3.} a6 25.Ra5 Rb8 26.a3
Ra7 {Black cannot guard all of his weak spots.} 27.Rxc6 Qxc6
28.Qxa7 Ra8 29.Qc5 Qb7 30.Kf2 {The intent is to guard his own
weaknesses, particularly on the second and third ranks.} h5
31.Be2 g6 32.Qd6 {The c-file is important because open.} Qc8
33.Rc5 Qb7 34.h4 a5 {A desperate attempt at a counter-attack.}
35.Rc7 Qb8 36.b5 a4 37.b6 Ra5 38.b7 {This game illustrates how
much greater weight the effect of the pieces on weaknesses has
in comparison to their effect on other points.} 1-0
Up's & Down's are everywhere but have full faith on yourself "you are a good player "
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:05 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

Game 68
[Event "Carlsbad it, CZE"]
[Site "Carlsbad it, CZE"]
[Date "1907.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "12"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Akiba Rubinstein"]
[Black "Richard Teichmann"]
[ECO "D61"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "46"]

1.d4 {Notes by Dr. Emanuel Lasker from "Lasker's Chess
Magazine" and Carl Schlechter from "Deutsche Schachzeitung"
1908.} d5 2.Nf3 e6 3.c4 Nf6 4.Bg5 Be7 5.Nc3 Nbd7 6.e3 O-O
7.Qc2 b6 {Schlechter: The best continuation is 7...c5.} 8.cxd5
exd5 9.Bd3 Bb7 10.O-O-O {Schlechter: Deserving serious
attention is 10.Rd1.} c5 11.h4 Rc8 {Schlechter: Weak. The
right plan was counterplay with ...c4, ...a6, ...b5 and ...b4,
and it is unclear who will come first.} 12.Kb1 Re8 13.dxc5
{!?} Rxc5 {Schlechter: If 13...bxc5 then 14.Bxf6 Nxf6 15.Bc4
is very unpleasant.} 14.Nd4 Ne4 {? Lasker: Black should have
played here 14...a6 threatening an advance of the queenside
pawns, which should have developed a powerful attack. The text
move is obviously bad. *** Schlechter: Preferable was
14...Nf8.} 15.Bxe4 dxe4 16.Ndb5 {!} Ba6 {Lasker: Necessary, as
17.Nd6, winning the exchange, was threatened.} 17.Qa4 {!} Bxb5
18.Nxb5 {Lasker: By a few simple strokes White has not only
circumvented the formation of any hostile attack, but his
pieces now virtually control the field.} Bxg5 19.hxg5 Re7
20.Rd4 Qa8 21.b4 {!} Rc8 22.Nd6 b5 {? Schlechter: If 22...Rc7
or 22...Rd8, then White wins simply by 23.f5.} 23.Nxc8 {!
Lasker: In view of Black's weak position he was quite
justified in resigning after losing the exchange. He could
not, of course, capture the queen since White would be left
with three pieces against the queen: 23...bxa4 24.Nxe7+ Kf8
25.Rxd7 and wins.} 1-0
Up's & Down's are everywhere but have full faith on yourself "you are a good player "
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:06 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

Game 69
[Event "Amsterdam Match"]
[Site "Amsterdam, The Netherlands"]
[Date "1908.12.26"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "1"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Abraham Speyer"]
[Black "Emanuel Lasker"]
[ECO "D55"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "78"]

1. d4 {Annotations by Emanuel Lasker} d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6
4. Bg5 Be7 5. e3 O-O 6. Nf3 b6 7. Bd3 {Pillsbury's
continuation was 7.cxd5 exd5 8.Bd3 with the intent of
castling, placing his knight on e5, his pawn on f4, and of
attacking the adverse King in a variety of manners. This
attack has been often conducted with success, but games lately
played by Teichmann indicate that by means of a timely retreat
of the knight to e8 the defense gains the upper
hand. Mr. Speijer conducts the opening in the style of Burn.}
dxc4 8. Bxc4 Bb7 9. O-O Nbd7 10. Qe2 a6 11. Rad1 c5 12. Bd3 b5
13. Bb1 Nd5 {White prepa res for e4-e5, Ne4 and massing of
pieces on the kingside. Black must foil this plan.} 14. Bxe7 {
14.Ne4 was a possibility, but an advantage thereby not
apparent.} Qxe7 15. e4 Nxc3 16. bxc3 Rfc8 17. Qe3 a5 18. e5
{He now prepares Ng5 (or Nd2-e4-d6).} Bxf3 19. gxf3 {To
strengthen his center and to provide open lines for an
attack.} Nb6 20. Kh1 {20.Be4 was here essential. The important
square d5 should not be left to the knight without a
struggle. Now the attack of Black comes so quick that the
counter attack of White must fail.} Nd5 21. Qd3 g6 22. Rg1 b4
23. cxb4 c4 24. Qc2 axb4 25. Rg3 Qa7 26. Qd2 Nc3 27. Rdg1 Nxb1
28. Rxb1 { 28.Qh6 Nc3 29.Rh3 would not avail White because of
29...Nd5} c3 29. Qf4 { If 29.Qh6 Qxd4 30.Rh3 Qxe5 and Black
must win the endgame.} Qxa2 30. Rbg1 Qd2 31. Qh4 c2 32. Rh3 h6
33. f4 c1=Q 34. Qxh6 Qxg1+ 35. Kxg1 Qe1+ 36. Kg2 Qe4+ 37. f3
Rc2+ 38. Kg3 Qe1+ 39. Kg4 Qg1+ 0-1
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:07 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

GAme 70
[Event "Carlsbad it, CZE"]
[Site "Carlsbad it, CZE"]
[Date "1907.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "17"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Geza Maroczy"]
[Black "Akiba Rubinstein"]
[ECO "C10"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "81"]

1.e4 {Notes by Dr. Emanuel Lasker in "Lasker's Chess Magazine"
1907. *** The most important game in the tournament, and in
many respects the most exciting, was the encounter between the
two leaders toward the close. Maroczy, the hero of many hard
fights, was half a point better off than the young Rubinstein,
but the latter had to meet weaker opponents subsequently. With
the instinct and judgement of a veteran, with confidence in
his ability to succeed in his remaining games, Rubinstein set
out with a determination to draw with Maroczy. The state of
the score would have impelled most players to take exceptional
risks in order to depose his antagonist and take his
place. Rubinstein is evidently au fait in all the arts of
winning tournaments besides games. An eyewitness thus
describes the attitude of the players at the conclusion of the
game: "That Rubinstein was perfectly satisfied with his
partial success was apparent from his beaming countenance;
Maroczy looked depressed in proportion.} e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4
4.Nxe4 Nd7 5.Nf3 Ngf6 6.Nxf6+ {Under the circumstances White's
tactics cannot be commended. By exchanging he not only does
not simplify, but actually develops Black's game. It should be
Black's business for that reason to find out how to develop
the knight on d7. Far preferable would have been 6.Ng3 leaving
Black's game cramped.} Nxf6 7.Bd3 c5 8.dxc5 Bxc5 9.O-O O-O
10.Bg5 {White wastes time with this move, which could only be
justified if followed up with Bxf6. Instead, 10.Bf4 is much
better, for Black cannot reply with 10...Bd6, because of
11.Bxd6 Qxd6 12.Bxh7+ winning the queen.} Be7 11.Qe2 Qc7
12.Rad1 {In order to be able to advance the queenside pawns it
would have been better to have played 12.Rfe1.} Rd8 13.c4 Bd7
14.Bd2 Rac8 15.Bc3 Be8 16.Qc2 h6 17.Ne5 Nd7 {Black has
cleverly anticipated all possible attacks on the kingside. The
position is remarkable. The black king is only protected by
pawns, and White has considerable force bearing on it, yet
nothing tangible can be done.} 18.Nxd7 Bxd7 {If 18...Rxd7,
with the object of doubling, White would reply 19.Qe2,
threatening Qe4 with a very promising attack.} 19.Qe2 Bc6
20.Qg4 Bf8 21.f4 {White should play 21.Rfe1, threatening Bf6
with much the better game. It is impossible to give all the
combinations that might arise, but as an instance the
following will show a possible continuation showing why 21.Bf6
cannot be played at once: 21...Rd7 22.Rfe1 Kh8 23.Be5 Qd8
24.Re3 f5 25.Qg6 Qg5 26.Rg3 Qxg6 27.Rxg6 Rcd8 28.Rxh6+ Kg8
29.Rh3 Be4 winning a piece.} Rxd3 {! As a means of winning,
this sacrifice cannot be recommended. But taking into account
that Black realized that his position was getting very
difficult, this move is highly ingenious and shows great power
of resistance. For the exchange versus a pawn Black has got
rid of one of the most dangerous pieces.} 22.Rxd3 Be4 23.Rd2
{If 23.Rg3 then 23...Qxc4 24.Bxg7 Bf5 25.Qh4 Bxg7 26.Qf6 Bg6
and Black should win.} Qxc4 24.Rfd1 Bd5 25.h3 {This is an
unnecessary defense, as Black does not threaten anything. The
proper thing to do would be to play 25.a3 first, and so save
this pawn. Maroczy undoubtedly labored under some delusion
when he made the subsequent combination. Otherwise he would
certainly have acted on the reorganized principle that a
player with a superior force should first of all render
everything secure.} f5 26.Qg6 {Had White played 25.a3 as
suggested, he could have complacently played now 26.Qg3. To
defend this pawn now and leave the other would not permit many
winning chances.} Qxf4 27.Rxd5 {The countersacrifice nearly
wins. At the same time, White guards against the sacrifice of
a a second exchange, to be followed by ...Bd6.} Qe3+ 28.Kh1
exd5 29.Qxf5 Rd8 30.Rxd5 Qc1+ 31.Kh2 Bd6+ 32.Be5 Bc7 {This
innocent-looking move is the only one which draws easily. If
32...Bxe5+ 33.Qxe5 Rxd5 (otherwise White plays Rd7) 34.Qxd5+
Kh7 35.Qxb7 Qf4+ 36.g3 with a pawn to the good, though winning
would be remote.} 33.Rxd8+ Bxd8 34.Qd7 Qg5 35.Bg3 Qe7 36.Qxe7
Bxe7 37.Be5 Kf7 38.Kg3 g6 39.Kf4 Ke6 40.Ke4 h5 41.b3 1/2-1/2
Up's & Down's are everywhere but have full faith on yourself "you are a good player "
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