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Games annotated by lasker

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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:07 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

Game 71
[Event "RUS-ch"]
[Site "Vilnius"]
[Date "1912.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "13"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "S Von Freymann"]
[Black "Akiba Rubinstein"]
[ECO "A02"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "64"]

1.f4 {Notes by Dr. Emanuel Lasker from "The Evening Post",
1912.} f5 2.Nf3 e6 3.e4 d5 4.exf5 exf5 5.d4 Nf6 6.Bd3 Bd6
7.O-O O-O 8.c4 c6 9.Nc3 Na6 {?! It would appear that 9...Ne4
would be better.} 10.c5 {!} Bc7 11.Ne5 Nb8 12.Qc2 Ne4 13.Be3
Be6 {13...Nd7 was imperative. Now White begins a violent
assault.} 14.g4 {!} g6 15.gxf5 gxf5 16.Kh1 Qf6 17.Bxe4 {!}
fxe4 {Black cannot capture 17...dxe4 because then 18.d5! cxd5
19.Rg1+ Kh8 20.Bd4 would win at once.} 18.f5 {!} Bxf5 {The
capture is compulsory, since Bg5 is threatened.} 19.Ng4 Bxg4
{Again forced. If 19...Qe6 20.Nh6+ and 21.Qf2 would win the
bishop.} 20.Rxf6 Rxf6 21.Rg1 Rg6 22.Rxg4 {!} Rxg4 23.Qb3 {!
The point of White's play. He now menaces both 24.Qxb7 and
24.Nxd5.} Nd7 24.Nxd5 cxd5 25.Qxd5+ Kh8 26.Qxd7 Rg7 27.Qf5 Kg8
28.Bg5 Re8 29.d5 Rf7 30.Qh3 Ref8 31.Qe6 Kh8 32.Bh4 {!} 1-0
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:07 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

Game 72
[Event "17, St.Petersburg"]
[Site "17, St.Petersburg"]
[Date "1909.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Rudolf Spielmann"]
[Black "Akiba Rubinstein"]
[ECO "C88"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "150"]

1.e4 {Notes by Dr. Emanuel Lasker.} e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6
4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 d6 8.c3 Bg4 {?!} 9.h3 Bh5
10.d3 O-O 11.Nbd2 d5 12.exd5 Nxd5 13.Nf1 Bf6 14.g4 Bg6 15.g5
Be7 16.Nxe5 Nxe5 17.Rxe5 Nb6 18.d4 Nd7 19.Re1 Bxg5 20.Bxg5
Qxg5+ 21.Qg4 {Black regains the pawn, but White's game is
nicely developed.} Qd8 22.Ng3 Nf6 23.Qf3 Qd7 24.Kh2 a5 25.a3
Rab8 26.Re5 Rfe8 27.Rg1 {Here White should take control of the
e-file, playing simply 27.Rae1.} b4 {Better was 27...Qd6. This
is one of the very rare occasions when Rubinstein undertakes a
doubtful combination.} 28.Rxa5 bxc3 29.Qxc3 Ne4 30.Nxe4 Rxe4
31.Rd5 Qe7 32.Rc5 Re2 33.Qg3 {Here White could play
33.Rxc7. After 33...Rxf2+ 34.Kg3 Qg5+ 35.Kxf2 Qf4+ 36.Ke1 Re8+
37.Kd1 Bh5+ 38.Kc2, the white king escapes via b1-a2 (for
example, if ...Qxf2+ and ...Qxg1+), and White's pawns are very
strong.} Qd6 34.Qxd6 {? Losing all his advantage! The right
continuation was 34.Bxf7+!; e.g., 34...Bxf7 35.Re5!! and White
wins or 34...Kxf7 35.Rxc7+ Ke6 36.d5+ Qxd5 37.Qg4+, and White
wins easily.} cxd6 35.Rc7 Rxb2 36.Rgc1 Kf8 37.Bc2 Ra2 38.Bxg6
hxg6 39.R1c2 Rxc2 40.Rxc2 Ra8 41.Rc3 Ra4 42.Rd3 Ke7 43.Kg3
{Here 43.d5 was necessary, stopping the advance of Black's
king. Then if 43...Kf6 44.Rf3+, or 43...f5 44.Re3+ and
45.Re6.} Ke6 {The mastery with which Rubinstein implements the
following endgame is more than prizeworthy.} 44.Kf3 Kd5 45.Ke2
g5 {!} 46.Rb3 f6 47.Ke3 Kc4 48.Rd3 d5 49.Kd2 Ra8 50.Kc2 Ra7
51.Kd2 Re7 52.Rc3+ {White loses a pawn anyway. If 52.Re3 Rb8
53.Rd3 Rb2+ 54.Ke3 Ra2 and White is in zugzwang.} Kxd4 53.a4
Ra7 54.Ra3 Ra5 55.Ra1 Kc4 56.Ke3 d4+ 57.Kd2 Rf5 58.Ke1 Kb4
59.Ke2 Ka5 60.Ra3 Rf4 61.Ra2 Rh4 62.Kd3 Rxh3+ 63.Kxd4 Rh4+
64.Kd3 Rxa4 65.Re2 Rf4 66.Ke3 Kb6 67.Rc2 Kb7 68.Rc1 Ra4 69.Rh1
Kc6 70.Rh7 Ra7 71.Ke4 Kd6 72.Kf5 g6+ {!} 73.Kxg6 Rxh7 74.Kxh7
Ke5 75.Kg6 g4 0-1
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:08 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

Game 73
[Event "16, St Petersburg"]
[Site "16, St Petersburg"]
[Date "1909.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Leo Fleischmann Forgacs"]
[Black "Rudolf Spielmann"]
[ECO "C12"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "61"]

1. e4 {Notes by Lasker.} e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Bb4
5. e5 h6 6. exf6 hxg5 7. fxg7 Rg8 8. h4 gxh4 {It would be
simpler to play the pressing ...Rxg7. If then 9.Qh5, Black
develops by Nc6.} 9. Qh5 Qf6 10. Nf3 Nd7 11. O-O-O Bxc3 {The
Knight was quite harmless, whereas the Bishop would have come
in handy at e7.} 12. bxc3 Qxg7 13. Qxh4 Nf8 {After the two
moves it has made, the Knight is still unfavorably
placed. Taking all that has been said into consideration,
Black's strategy stands condemned. The tactical prove of its
insufficiency is given by White in grand style.} 14. Qf4 f6
15. Bd3 Qe7 16. g3 c5 17. Rh6 c4 18. Be2 Ng6 19. Qg4 {Fine
play. On this dangerous place the Queen takes up a most
forcible position.} Qf7 20. Nh4 Nxh4 21. Qxh4 Ke7 22. f4
{Wonderfully fine. The Pawn comes as a valuable ally to the
heavy pieces.} Bd7 23. f5 exf5 24. Bxc4 {Elegant. If 24...dxc4
25.Re1+ and White wins the Queen in reply to any King's move;
and if ...Be6, d5 would win.} Rg4 25. Re1+ Be6 26. Qh1 Kd6
27. Rh7 Qg8 28. Bb3 Re4 29. Rxb7 Rc8 30. Qf1 Rc6 31. Rxe4 1-0
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:08 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

Game 74
[Event "St Petersburg"]
[Site "St Petersburg"]
[Date "1909.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "7"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Akiba Rubinstein"]
[Black "Jacques Mieses"]
[ECO "D02"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "88"]

1.d4 {Notes by Dr. Emanuel Lasker.} d5 2.Nf3 c5 3.c4 Nf6
4.cxd5 cxd4 5.Nxd4 Nxd5 6.e4 Nf6 {Here interesting is
6...Nc7!? The continuation 7.Bf4 Nd7 8.Bc4 e5 9.Qb3 Qf6 10.Bg3
leads to a complicated game.} 7.Nc3 e5 {?! If 7...a6 8.e5 Nd5
9.e6 and Black stands worse. The right move here is 7...e6.}
8.Bb5+ {!} Bd7 9.Nf5 Nc6 {?!} 10.Nd6+ Bxd6 11.Qxd6 Qe7
12.Qxe7+ Nxe7 13.Be3 a6 14.Bxd7+ Nxd7 15.Ke2 Rc8 16.Rhd1 Nc5
17.Bxc5 {Better was to keep the bishop; e.g., 17.Rac1 Ne6
18.Nd5, etc.} Rxc5 18.Rac1 Nc6 {A mistake. Black should play
18...Rc7 followed by ...O-O.} 19.Rd5 {!} Rxd5 {If 19...Rc4
20.b3 Rd4 21.Ke3 f6 22.Na4 Ke7 23.Nc5 Rxd5 (23...Rb8 24.Nxb7)
24.exd5 Nb4 25.d6+ with advantage for White.} 20.exd5 Nd4+
21.Kd3 Ke7 22.f4 {!} f6 23.fxe5 fxe5 24.Ke4 Kd6 25.Rf1 Rc8
26.Rf7 Rc4 27.Kd3 Rb4 28.Rxg7 {Also strong was 28.b3 and White
will win at least a pawn; for example, 28...Nb5 29.Nxb5! Rxb5
30.Rxg7 h5 31.Rh7 Rxd5+ 32.Ke3.} Rxb2 29.Rxh7 Rxg2 30.Rh6+ Kd7
31.Rh7+ Kd6 32.Rh6+ Kd7 33.Ne4 {!} Rxa2 34.Rh7+ Kd8 35.d6 Nb5
{The threat was Nf6 and Rh8+ mate.} 36.Kc4 Ra5 37.Rxb7 Na3+
38.Kb4 {!} Rb5+ 39.Rxb5 Nxb5 40.Kc5 Kd7 41.Kd5 a5 42.Nc5+ Ke8
43.Kxe5 Kf7 44.Nb7 {Rubinstein conducted the endgame of this
game with monumental mastery.} 1-0
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:08 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

Game 75
[Event "Ostend"]
[Site "Ostend"]
[Date "1906.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Akiba Rubinstein"]
[Black "Carl Schlechter"]
[ECO "D00"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "66"]

1.d4 {Notes by Dr. Emanuel Lasker, Carl Schlechter and Leopold
Hoffer. *** Lasker: A game that in no way distinguishes itself
in the opening, novel though the course pursued by the two
brilliant masters may be, it is void of interest until the
endgame stage is reached. Then a position full of of varied
combinations is arrived at. A draw should, nevertheless, have
resulted. The first player concludes by a blunder, but his
game was hopeless then.} d5 2.Bf4 e6 3.e3 Bd6 4.Bg3 Nf6 5.Nd2
Bxg3 6.hxg3 Qe7 7.f4 {Lasker: To prevent 7...e5 which, in view
of the weakness of White on the black squares, would have
allowed Black a dominating sphere of action.} Ne4 {Lasker:
Hardly advancing his cause. 7...c5 at once would have yielded
a quicker development. *** Schlechter: Here 7...b6!? deserves
attention.} 8.Nxe4 dxe4 9.Qd2 Nd7 10.g4 Nb6 11.Be2 Bd7 12.Nh3
f6 13.Nf2 Bc6 14.c4 O-O-O 15.O-O-O h6 16.Qc2 f5 17.Qc3
{Hoffer: After 17.g3! White is better.} Kb8 18.gxf5 exf5 19.g4
Bd7 20.Rdg1 g5 21.Nh3 {Lasker: 21.fxg5 first would have
avoided the ensuing complication. The exchange of both pawns
on the kingside, though opening the rook file for Black, would
have resulted to the advantage of White, inasmuch as the extra
pawn on the queenside should be at greater value than the
isolated pawn of Black, all other things being equal. ***
Schlechter: Much better is 21.fxg5 hxg5 22.gxf5 with
advantage.} fxg4 22.Bxg4 Bxg4 23.Rxg4 Qe6 24.Rhg1 Qxc4 25.Qxc4
Nxc4 26.fxg5 hxg5 27.R4g3 {? Lasker: More natural is 27.Nxg5
Nxe3 28.Rxe4 Rhe8 which would have readily led to a draw. ***
Hoffer: Perhaps White should try 27.R1g3!?} g4 28.Nf2 Rh2
29.Nd1 {? Schlechter: Better is 29.Nxg4! Rxb2 30.Ne5 Rb4
31.Rg8 Rc8 32.Nxc4 Rxc4 33.Kb2.} c5 {! Lasker: Charming an
attack out of nothing. 30.dxc5 would now, of course, be bad,
as Black would then double his rooks on the 2nd rank, and at
the very least recoup himself.} 30.R3g2 {Schlechter and
Lasker: This loses a pawn and the game. But, 30.Rxg4 cxd4
31.Rxe4 is met by the elegant move 31...Rc8! whereupon 32.Rxd4
Na3+ 33.Nc3 Rc2+ 34.Kd1 Rxb2 35.Ne2 Rcc2 will ultimately win.}
Rxg2 31.Rxg2 cxd4 32.exd4 Rxd4 33.Rxg4 Rxd1+ {The rest of the
game is unavailable.} 0-1
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:09 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

Game 76
[Event "Baden-Baden it, GER"]
[Site "Baden-Baden it, GER"]
[Date "1925.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "2"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Jan-Willem Te Kolste"]
[Black "Carlos Torre-Repetto"]
[ECO "C12"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "54"]

1. e4 {Notes by Lasker} e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Bb4
5. Nge2 dxe4 6. a3 Be7 7. Bxf6 gxf6 8. Nxe4 b6 9. N2c3 Bb7
10. Qf3 {Though check with the Knight is now threatened,
White's intention is not aggresive but merely the protection
of the g-pawn.} c6 11. O-O-O f5 12. Ng3 Nd7 13. Bc4 {But here
White begins to be aggresive and therby he puts himself in the
wrong for his aim is not even remotely warranted by his
advantage. Again he should strive to safeguard his g-pawn by
13.Nh5, to be followed by Rg1, and afterwards possibly by h3
and g4 with some little pressure on the center and on the
h-pawn, proportionate to his advantage in mobility. As he
plays White begins to slide first very slowly; afterwards more
quickly.} Qc7 14. Rhe1 Nf6 15. Qe2 O-O-O {Black has defended
conscientiously. If White now continues 16.Nxf5 Qf4+ 17.Ne3
Rxd4 18.Ba6 he can still obtain equality. But here is the
parting of the ways.} 16. Bxe6+ {White fancies that he holds
an advantage and attempts to win. The punishment is
immediate.} fxe6 17. Qxe6+ Rd7 18. Nxf5 Bd8 19. Ne4 Nxe4
20. Rxe4 Kb8 21. g3 Bc8 22. Qh6 Rf7 23. Ne3 Rxf2 24. c3 Rg8
25. d5 Bg5 26. Qxc6 Qxc6 27. dxc6 Bf5 0-1
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:10 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

Game 77
[Event "Berlin GM"]
[Site "04"]
[Date "1918.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Akiba Rubinstein"]
[Black "Emanuel Lasker"]
[ECO "D33"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "99"]

1.d4 {Notes by Dr. Emanuel Lasker.} d5 2.Nf3 c5 3.c4 e6 4.cxd5
exd5 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.g3 Nf6 7.Bg2 Be6 8.O-O Be7 9.dxc5 Bxc5 10.Bg5
O-O 11.Rc1 Bb6 {!? A bit speculative, but it seems to be the
right continuation.} 12.b3 Re8 13.e3 Nb4 {! Threatening
14...h6 15.Bxf6 Qxf6 16.a3 Nc6 17.Nxd5 Qb2!.} 14.Nd4 h6
15.Bxf6 Qxf6 16.a3 Nc6 17.Nxd5 Bxd5 18.Bxd5 Nxd4 19.exd4 Re7
20.Qg4 Bxd4 {Better is 20..Qxd4 21.Rc8+ Rxc8 22.Qxc8+ Kh7
23.Bxb7 g6 24.Ba6 Rc7 and Black has a good position as
compensation for the pawn.} 21.Bxb7 {!} Rd8 {Naturally not
21...Rxb7? because of 22.Rc8+.} 22.Rc6 Qe5 23.Rc8 Rxc8
24.Qxc8+ Kh7 25.Qc2+ g6 26.Bf3 Bb2 27.a4 a5 28.Rd1 Qc3 29.Qxc3
Bxc3 30.Kg2 Kg7 31.Rd6 Bb4 32.Rd8 Bc3 33.Bd5 h5 34.Bc4 Bb4
35.h4 Be1 36.Rd5 Bb4 37.f3 Be1 38.g4 hxg4 39.fxg4 Ra7 40.h5
gxh5 41.Rxh5 Re7 42.Kf3 Bd2 43.Rd5 Bb4 44.Bd3 Kf8 45.Rb5 Re1
46.Be4 Bd2 47.Rb8+ Kg7 48.Bd5 Re3+ 49.Kf2 Re7 50.Rb5 1/2-1/2
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:10 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

Game 78
[Event "Casual Game"]
[Site "Cologne GER"]
[Date "1898.??.??"]
[EventDate "1898.07.31"]
[Round "12"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Rudolf Rezso Charousek"]
[Black "Amos Burn"]
[ECO "C39"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "54"]

1. e4 {Notes by Em. Lasker.} e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. h4 g4
5. Ne5 Bg7 6. d4 Nf6 7. Nxg4 Nxe4 8. Bxf4 Qe7 9. Qe2 Bxd4 {Had
black played for development, 9...d5 would have been the
move.} 10. c3 Bg7 11. Ne3 Qe6 12. g3 O-O 13. Bh3 f5 14. O-O d6
15. Nd2 Nxd2 16. Qxd2 Nc6 17. Rae1 Qf7 18. Bg2 Kh8 19. Nd5 Ne5
20. Bg5 c6 {Black should develop by Be6 and Rae8} 21. Nf4 d5
22. h5 Bd7 {Now that the Kt on e5 has to be supported by the
KB, Black cannot play h6 on account of BxP.} 23. h6 Bf6
24. Bxf6+ Qxf6 25. Nh5 Qd6 26. Rxe5 Qxe5 27. Re1 {The Queen
can no longer guard the point d4, so Black resigns.} 1-0
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:10 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

game 79
[Event "Hastings"]
[Site "Hastings"]
[Date "1895.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "02"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Wilhelm Steinitz"]
[Black "Carl Schlechter"]
[ECO "C54"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "97"]

1. e4 {Notes by Emanuel Lasker} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3
Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. cxd4 Bb4+ 7. Nc3 Nxe4 8. O-O Bxc3 9. bxc3 d5
10. Ba3 {A novelty by the leader of the White forces. White
intends to give up the piece in order to prevent Black from
castling into safety.} Be6 {Black declines the acceptance of
the sacrifice with doubtful judgement. If 10...dxc4 11 Re1 f5
12 Nd2 Kf7 13 Nxe4 fxe4 14 Rxe4 Qf6, (this appears to be the
only possible move as ...Re8 would be answered by Qh5+ and
...Bf5 by Rf4) 15 Qe2 Be6 (?) 16 Rae1 Rhe8 17 d5 and wins or
15...Bd7 (?) 16 Qxc4+ Kg6 17 d5 Ne5 18 Qxc7 Rhe8 19 Qxb7 with
three pawns for the piece or 15...Bf5 (!) 16 Rf4 h5 17 Qxc7+
Kg6 18 d5 Ne5 19 Qxb7 Rhe8 and although Black is two Pawns
behind for the piece, and may lose a third, his attack is
excellent.} 11. Bb5 Nd6 12. Bxc6+ bxc6 13. Ne5 O-O 14. Nxc6
Qf6 {Black plays exceedingly well for position. It is with
best judgement that he allows White the opportunity of
doubling his Queen's Pawn, and White is wise to abstain from
it, as by doing so he would involve both his Knight and his
c-pawn in difficulties. } 15 15. Rb1 Bf5 16. Rb3 {The Rook
ought to have left the open file, as Rb4 would be answered by
a5 ; and the move actually made loses the exchange for a
Pawn.} Bd7 17. Nb4 Ba4 18. Nxd5 Qd8 19. Qd3 Bxb3 20. axb3 Re8
21. c4 c6 22. Ne3 Qd7 23. d5 Rad8 24. Bb2 f6 25. Bd4 {A poor
place for the Bishop. It seems as though Ba3 would give him
better prospects of fixing his Pawns far ahead in the camp of
his adversary.} Nc8 26. Rd1 Nb6 27. d6 {A faulty combination,
which by opening up all lines to the Rooks endangers White's
game to a considerable extent. White probably expected to win
a Piece in case the Pawn was captured, but overlooked the
retort of Black’s 29th move regaining the Piece immediately.}
Qxd6 $17 28. c5 Qe6 29. cxb6 c5 30. bxa7 Rxd4 31. Qc2 Rxd1+
32. Qxd1 Qf7 33. h4 Qxa7 34. h5 h6 35. Nf5 Qc7 36. g3 Qc6
37. Kh2 Kh8 38. Qg4 Qd7 39. Qf3 Re5 40. Nh4 Kg8 41. Ng6 Re8
42. Nf4 Rb8 43. Qe4 Qf7 44. Qf5 Qxb3 45. Qxc5 Qb5 46. Qc7 Re8
47. Kg2 Rb8 48. Kh2 Re8 49. Kg2 1/2-1/2
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forumking

Bishop

Posts: 131

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:26 pm

Post Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:10 pm

Re: Games annotated by lasker

Game 80
[Event "Hastings"]
[Site "Hastings"]
[Date "1895.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Mikhail Chigorin"]
[Black "Wilhelm Steinitz"]
[ECO "C52"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "90"]

1. e4 {Notes by Emanuel Lasker} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4
Bxb4 5. c3 Ba5 6. O-O d6 7. d4 exd4 8. cxd4 Nf6 9. e5 dxe5
10. Ba3 Be6 {So far everything is book. It has always been the
opinion that Black, although two Pawns ahead, will not be able
to develop his Pieces, as Castling King's side is prevented,
and the King dare not occupy the centre any length of
time. Black seemed to believe that he may get his King safely
Castled to the Queen's side ; but this game does not
corroborate such an opinion, in spite of the success which
attended that manoeuvre in this instance.} 11. Bb5
{Tchigorin’s favourite post for the Bishop in the Evans'
Gambit.} Qd5 12. Qa4 O-O-O 13. Bxc6 bxc6 14. Bc5 Bb6 15. Qa6+
{White ultimately wins the exchange by this manauvre, but at
an enormous expense. It would have been better to leave things
as they were,and to continue simply with 15 Nxe5. If then
15...Nd7 16 Nxc6 must win the exchange in favourable position;
and if 15....Ne4 16 Bxb6 cxb6 17 Qxa7 will equalise the
material forces. with the position to White's advantage.} Kb8
16. Nxe5 Nd7 17. Nc3 Nxc5 18. Qe2 Qd6 19. dxc5 Qxc5 20. Na4
Qb5 21. Qxb5 cxb5 22. Nxb6 axb6 23. Nc6+ Kb7 24. Nxd8+ Rxd8
25. a3 c5 26. f3 Kc6 27. Rfd1 Ra8 { A Rook being very well
qualified to support advancing Pawns and to check the approach
of the hostile King, it is judicious play to avoid its
exchange for the present.} 28. Kf2 Ra4 29. Ke3 h5 {Advancing
these Pawns, which constitute the only weakness in Black's
camp, protects them against any possible attack of the Rooks
or King.} 30. Kd2 b4 31. axb4 Rxb4 32. Rdb1 Rxb1 {Now it is
just as well to simplify, two united passed Pawns with the
support of the King and Bishop being more than a match for
King and Rook. Black need only take care to leave the passed
Pawns as much as possible on the colour not dominated by the
Bishop-i.e. on black squares.} 33. Rxb1 b5 34. Ra1 b4 35. Kc2
Kd5 36. Rd1+ Kc4 37. Rd8 Bd5 38. h4 Kd4 39. Rb8 Be6 40. Rb7 g6
41. Rb5 b3+ 42. Kb2 c4 43. Rb4 Kd3 44. Rb6 c3+ 45. Kb1 Ke3
{Threatening 13 Bf5+ 45 g4 would be answered by Kxf3. White is
therefore perfectly helpless.} 0-1
Up's & Down's are everywhere but have full faith on yourself "you are a good player "
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