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games annotated by alekhine

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stuart41088

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Post Fri Feb 25, 2011 10:30 am

Re: games annotated by alekhine

Game 11
[Event "London"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1932.??.??"]
[EventDate "1932.??.??"]
[Round "1"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Geza Maroczy"]
[Black "Vera Menchik"]
[ECO "C13"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "65"]

1. e4 {Notes by Alekhine} e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7
5. exd5 exd5 6. Bd3 Nc6 7. Nge2 Nb4 8. O-O {I would prefer
here 8.Ng3 at once in order to keep (after 8...Nxd3+ 9.Qxd3)
the opportunity of castling on either wing.} O-O 9. Ng3 Nxd3
10. Qxd3 h6 11. Bf4 Bd6 12. Qd2 Bxf4 13. Qxf4 c6 14. Rfe1 Re8
15. h3 Bd7 16. Rxe8+ Qxe8 17. Qd2 Qf8 18. Re1 Re8 19. Nb1
Rxe1+ 20. Qxe1 Qe8 21. Qd1 Ne4 22. Nxe4 Qxe4 23. c3 {White has
not the shadow of a winning chance and would have done better
to exchange Queens. After the text move Black obtains a slight
positional advantage.} Qg6 {The idea of putting the Bishop in
front of the Queen is not good and leads in a few moves to a
drawn position. Correct and simple enough was 23...Bf5 24.Nd2
Qd3 25.Qe1 Kh7, etc, and White would have to play very
carefully to obtain a draw.} 24. Kh1 Bf5 25. Nd2 Be4 26. Nxe4
Qxe4 27. f3 Qe3 28. Qb3 Qc1+ 29. Kh2 Qf4+ 30. Kg1 Qe3+ 31. Kh2
Qf4+ 32. Kh1 Qc1+ 33. Kh2 1/2-1/2
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Post Fri Feb 25, 2011 10:43 pm

Re: games annotated by alekhine

game 12
[Event "London"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1932.??.??"]
[EventDate "1932.??.??"]
[Round "1"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Salomon Flohr"]
[Black "George Alan Thomas"]
[ECO "D51"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "86"]

1. d4 {Notes by Alekhine} Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Bg5 Nbd7
5. e3 c6 6. cxd5 exd5 7. Bd3 Be7 8. Qc2 O-O 9. Nge2 Re8
10. Ng3 Nf8 11. O-O-O b5 12. Nf5 Bxf5 {Up to now Black has
followed the modern theoretical method and obtained a position
with good fighting chances. But this exchange was not
necessary. The logical line was 12...a5, followed by a4 and
eventually b4, etc.} 13. Bxf5 b4 {? Allowing the White knight
to get control of the important spot c5. 13...a5, and a4 was
still preferable.} 14. Na4 Ne4 15. Bxe7 Qxe7 16. Kb1 Qf6
17. Bxe4 Rxe4 18. Rc1 {The situation is now cleared. Black has
no compensation for the weakness of his Queen's side
pawns. Flohr's method of exploiting his advantage is very
instructive. He finally succeeds in obtaining pressure on the
King's wing after having forced Black's move 28...f6, and the
combined attack on both wings puts Black in inextricable
difficulties. The final moves are pretty.} Rc8 19. Nc5 Re7
20. Ka1 a5 21. Nd3 Qd6 22. Qa4 Ra7 23. Nc5 h6 24. Rc2 Ne6
25. h3 Nd8 26. Rhc1 Qg6 27. Rd2 Rca8 28. Nd3 f6 29. Nc5 Qf5
30. Qb3 Kh8 31. a4 Re7 32. Qd1 Nf7 33. Nd3 Ra6 34. g4 Qc8
35. Nf4 Rd7 36. h4 Qe8 37. Rdc2 Rd6 38. Qd3 Ra8 {Or 38...Rb6
39.Rc5, etc.} 39. Rxc6 Rxc6 40. Rxc6 Nd8 {! The Rook cannot be
taken on account of 41.Ng6+, followed by 42.Ne7+} 41. Rc7
Qxa4+ 42. Kb1 Qe8 43. Re7 {! With the possible end 43...Qg8
44.Ng6+ Kh7 45.Nf8+ Kh8 46.Re8 followed by 47.Qh7+ Qxh7 48.Ng6
mate.} 1-0
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Post Sat Feb 26, 2011 11:32 pm

Re: games annotated by alekhine

game 13
[Event "London"]
[Site "it"]
[Date "1932.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "01"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Victor Berger"]
[Black "Georges Koltanowski"]
[ECO "E94"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "81"]

1.d4 {Notes by Alekhine} Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3
{The newer system inaugurated by 5.f3 seems to be preferable,
but even after the text move White could play more
aggresively, without any risk. For instance at his 7th move
(instead of O-O) h3 followed by Be3, Qd2, etc.} O-O 6.Be2 Nbd7
7.O-O e5 8.d5 a5 {Owing to the passive play of his opponent,
Black could try to take the initiative by playing here
8...Nh5, etc.} 9.Ne1 Nc5 10.Qc2 Nfd7 {Rather complicated and
not very convincing chess. Why not make at once the
unavoidable move 10...b6 (11.Be3 Ng4; or 11.f3 Nh5, etc.}
11.Be3 b6 12.Rd1 Nb8 13.a3 f5 14.f3 Nba6 15.Rb1 fxe4 16.fxe4
Rxf1+ 17.Bxf1 a4 {! The only continuation in this rather dull
game which permits Black to obtain a kind of harmless
initiative. By Buerger's accurate defensive play, of course,
the game has to end as it did.} 18.Nd3 {And not 18.Nxa4 Nxe4
19.Qxe4? Bf5, etc.} Bd7 19.Be2 Bf6 20.Bd1 Bg5 21.Qd2 Bxe3+
22.Qxe3 Nxd3 23.Qxd3 Qg5 24.Bf3 Nc5 25.Qe2 Rf8 26.Re1 Kg7
27.Qe3 Qxe3+ 28.Rxe3 h5 29.Bd1 Kh6 30.Rf3 Rxf3 31.Bxf3 g5
32.Be2 g4 33.Kf2 Kg5 34.g3 h4 35.Ke3 hxg3 36.hxg3 Be8 37.Bd1
Bd7 38.Bc2 Be8 39.Kd2 Bd7 40.Ke3 Be8 41.Bd1 1/2-1/2
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Post Sun Feb 27, 2011 11:56 pm

Re: games annotated by alekhine

game 14
[Event "London (07)"]
[Site "London (07)"]
[Date "1932.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Alexander Alekhine"]
[Black "Savielly Tartakower"]
[ECO "A51"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "63"]

1. d4 {Notes by A. Alekhine} Nf6 2. c4 e5 3. dxe5 Ne4 {Less
usual, but not better than 3...Ng4 against which I have had
(excepting the Gilg game, Semmering, 1926) rather pleasant
experiences, too.} 4. Nd2 Nc5 {If 4...Bb4 then 5 Nf3 followed
by a3, in order to obtain the advantage of the two Bishops.}
5. Ngf3 Nc6 6. g3 Qe7 7. Bg2 g6 8. Nb1 {! This at first sight
surprising move is in reality perfectly logical. After Black
has clearly shown his intention to develop the King's Bishop
at g7, White has no longer to reckon with any action on the
diagonal e1-a5. There is no reason, therefore, for delay in
placing his Knight on the dominating square d5.} Nxe5 9. O-O
Nxf3+ 10. exf3 Bg7 11. Re1 Ne6 12. Nc3 O-O 13. Nd5 Qd8 14. f4
c6 {He has willy-nilly to dislodge the White Knight--thus
creating a dangerous weakness at d6--because after the
immediate 14 d6 the temporary sacrifice 15 f5, etc., would be
too dangerous for him.} 15. Nc3 d6 16. Be3 Qc7 17. Rc1 Bd7
18. Qd2 Rad8 19. Red1 Bc8 20. Ne4 Nc5 {This will be finally
refuted by the combination starting with White's 24th
move--but owing to the weakness mentioned above Black's
position was already very difficult. Unsatisfactory would be,
for instance, 20 d5 21 cxd5 Rxd5 22 Nf6+, followed by 23 Bxd5
etc., winning the exchange; or 20 ...c5 21 f5! gxf5 22 Nc3 Nd4
23 Nd5 Qb8 24 Bg5, etc. ; and after the comparatively safest
20 ...b6 White could also easily increase his advantage in
space by continuing 21 b4 etc.} 21. Nxd6 Na4 22. c5 Nxb2
23. Re1 b5 24. cxb6 {! A surprising but not very complicated
combination. The only difficulty consisted in the necessity of
foreseeing this possibility several moves before, when making
the capture 21 Nxd6.} Qxd6 25. Qxd6 Rxd6 26. bxa7 Bb7 27. Bc5
Rdd8 28. Bxf8 Kxf8 29. Bxc6 Bxc6 30. Rxc6 Ra8 {The last moves
of Black were practically forced and, his position being
absolutely hopeless, he prefers a quick end. If, instead of
this, 30 Bd4 then 31 Rd6, also winning immediately.} 31. Rb6
Rxa7 32. Rb8# 1-0
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Post Wed Mar 02, 2011 1:16 am

Re: games annotated by alekhine

game 15

[Event "Nottingham"]
[Site "Nottingham"]
[Date "1936.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Max Euwe"]
[Black "Salomon Flohr"]
[ECO "D67"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "37"]

1. d4 {Notes by Alekhine} d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7
5. e3 O-O 6. Nc3 Nbd7 7. Rc1 c6 8. Bd3 dxc4 9. Bxc4 Nd5
10. Bxe7 Qxe7 11. Ne4 N5f6 12. Ng3 e5 {Introduced by
Dr. Lasker against me at Zurich, 1934. Because of Black's loss
of that game the move had, as usual, a bad press. the present
game shows that it is as playable as Capablanca's
12...Qb4+.}13. O-O exd4 14. Nf5 Qd8 15. N3xd4 Ne5 16. Bb3 Bxf5
17. Nxf5 g6 {! This is the correct move. Dr. Lasker against me
played 17...Qb6? and lost speedily : 18 Qd6! Ned7 19 Rfd1 Rad8
20 Qg3 g6 21 Qg5 Kh8 22 Nd6 Kg7 23 e4! Ng8 24 Rd3 f6 25 Nf5+
Kh8 26 Qxg6 resigns.} 18. Qd4 Qxd4 19. Nxd4 1/2-1/2
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Post Thu Mar 03, 2011 12:10 am

Re: games annotated by alekhine

game 16
[Event "Nottingham"]
[Site "Nottingham"]
[Date "1936.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "William Winter"]
[Black "Milan Vidmar"]
[ECO "D68"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "56"]

1. d4 {Notes by Alekhine} d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Nbd7
5. e3 Be7 6. Nf3 O-O 7. Rc1 c6 8. Bd3 dxc4 9. Bxc4 Nd5
10. Bxe7 Qxe7 11. O-O Nxc3 12. Rxc3 e5 13. Qc2 e4 {The
alternative 13...exd4 14.exd4 is not without danger for Black,
for instance: 14...Nf6 15.Re1 Qd6 16.Ng5 h6 (or ...Qf4 17.Nxf7
and wins as in the game Lowenfisch vs. Riumin, Moscow 1935)
17.Nxf7 Rxf7 18.Qb3 and wins. (Dr Alkhine vs. Petersen, Orebro
1935). But by playing in this variation 14...Nb6 (instead of
...Nf6) Black still seems to have an adequate defence.}
14. Nd2 Nf6 15. a3 {Too slow. The correct move, after which
White remains with a slight advantage is Bbe with the idea of
answering ...Bf5 with f4 and eventually playing Rc5. By this
continuation Black could hardly avoid moving the Knight to d5
and the consequent exchange, which in the majority of cases
secures White the contrpl of the c-file.} Bf5 16. Rc1 {As
White cannot be sure in this position that he will need this
Rook at c1 and as he intends to play f4 anyhow, he should play
that move prior to the Rook move.} Rad8 17. b4 h5 {A good
positional move which would be useful, for instance if White
should play 18.b5 thus allowing a K-side attack after
18...cxb5 19.Bxb5 Nd5 followed by Qg5, etc.} 18. f4 g6 19. Qb3
Rd7 {! In expectation of the following reply. Otherwise he
could improve his game by the simple 19...Kg7.} 20. b5 {? This
advance must be based on a miscalculation. Agood move was
20.Nf1 after which the issue would still be uncertain.} c5
21. Qa4 {Or 21.d5 Rfd8 simply winning a Pawn. This was the
object of 19...Rd7.} cxd4 22. exd4 Qd6 23. Nb3 {Now all the
White pieces are concentrated without effect on the Q-side and
the King's position becomes very exposed.} Qxf4 24. Rf1 Qd6
25. Qxa7 {A meagre satisfaction, for the fight will be decided
by the positional, not the material, advantage.} b6 26. Qa4
Rc7 {Threatening 27...Nd5} 27. Rg3 Ng4 {!} 28. Be2 Nxh2 {! A
well played game by Dr. Vidmar.} 0-1
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Post Fri Mar 04, 2011 12:33 am

Re: games annotated by alekhine

game 17

[Event "Nottingham"]
[Site "Nottingham"]
[Date "1936.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "William Winter"]
[Black "George Alan Thomas"]
[ECO "D50"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "58"]

1. d4 {Notes by Alekhine} d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7
5. e3 Nbd7 6. Nf3 {White can avoid the following
simplification by playing 6.Rc1 c6 7.Bd3; but this is hardly
necessary, for in the following endgame the chances of the
first player will be better on account of the greater freedom
in the center and the open b-file.} Ne4 7. Bxe7 Qxe7 8. Qc2 c6
9. Nxe4 dxe4 10. Qxe4 Qb4+ 11. Nd2 Qxb2 12. Qb1 {After 12.Rb1,
Black would do better not to take the a-pawn because of the
possible attack commencing by Bd3, Ke2, etc. but play 12...Qc3
after which White could hardly avoid the exchange of Queens.}
Qc3 {Black prefers to delay the exchange for one move in order
to have thee opponent's Rook at c1 and not b1.} 13. Qc1 Qxc1+
14. Rxc1 c5 {After 14...e5 15.Nf3 the opening of the e-file
would be in White's favor.} 15. g3 {A good idea, as the Bishop
will have excellent prospects on the long diagonal. Still in
the following White omits to take full profit of the
positional advantage.} Ke7 16. Bg2 Rd8 17. Ke2 {Here was, for
instance, the right moment to force by 17.Nb3 the Pawn
exchange in the middle, as after 17...cxd4 18.exd4 White could
even Castle in order to occupy promptly the central files with
his Rooks. After the move selected Black succeeds through
accurate defence in avoiding furthewr trouble.} Rb8 {Now he
will ber able to answer Nb3 with ...b6.} 18. Rc3 cxd4 {Rather
surprising, but well calculated. Black has just time to
develop his Bishop.} 19. exd4 Nf6 20. Nf3 Bd7 21. Ne5 Be8
22. Ke3 Nd7 23. Ra3 {No more promising was 23.f4 f6 etc.} Nxe5
24. dxe5 a6 25. Rb1 {White's last hope to get some advantage
but the following move destroys such illusions.} b5 {Forcing a
speedy liquidation.} 26. Rxa6 bxc4 27. Ra7+ Kf8 28. Rxb8 Rxb8
29. Rc7 Rb2 1/2-1/2
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Post Fri Mar 04, 2011 9:11 pm

Re: games annotated by alekhine

game 18
[Event "Nottingham"]
[Site "Nottingham"]
[Date "1936.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Samuel Reshevsky"]
[Black "Salomon Flohr"]
[ECO "D26"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "46"]

1. d4 {Notes by Alekhine} d5 2. c4 dxc4 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 c5
5. Bxc4 e6 6. O-O Nc6 7. Qe2 a6 8. Rd1 b5 9. Bb3 c4 10. Bc2
Nb4 11. Nc3 Nxc2 12. Qxc2 Bb7 13. d5 {This whole variation has
been exhaustively analysed in the course of the last few
years, and the text move has - since the games
Eliskases-Flohr, Hastings, 1933-34, and Vidmar- Grunfeld,
Warsaw, 1935 - been considered to give White a strong
initiative. Flohr's innovation in the present game seems to
rehabilitate the whole line of defence.} Qc7 {! The main idea
of this is to block the center by e5 in case White plays 14
e4. 13...exd5 instead , as played in the games mentioned
above, would be answered by 14 e4 with good effect.} 14. e4
{As 14 dxe6 fxe6 15 e4 does not work on account of b4 there is
nothing better than to complete the development of the
forces.} e5 15. Bg5 {If immediately 15 Be3 then Ng4.} Nd7
16. Be3 Bc5 {Black obviously considers the opening problem as
already solved, and does not intend to simplify. By 16...Bd6
he would have more chances of taking advantage of his majority
on the Q side, inasmuch as White could certainly obtain
nothing by a demonstration on the other wing, such as 17 Nh4
g6 18 Bh6 f6.} 17. Bxc5 Qxc5 18. b3 {! This is now possible as
b5 can be answered by 19 Na4.} O-O 19. bxc4 Qxc4 20. Nd2 Qc7
21. Qb2 Rfc8 22. Rac1 Nc5 23. Nb3 {After ...Nxb3 followed by
...Qd6, Black would still have the slightly better game
because of his Q side pawn majority.} 1/2-1/2
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Post Sun Mar 06, 2011 9:38 am

Re: games annotated by alekhine

game 19

[Event "Nottingham"]
[Site "Nottingham"]
[Date "1936.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Reuben Fine"]
[Black "Milan Vidmar"]
[ECO "D48"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "48"]

1. d4 {Notes by Alekhine} d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 e6
5. Nc3 Nbd7 6. Bd3 dxc4 7. Bxc4 b5 8. Bd3 a6 9. e4 b4 {Thus
avoiding the main variation of the Meran defence which
continues 9...c5. The move seems to give Black quite a
playable game, especially in connection with his strong 14th
move.} 10. Na4 c5 11. dxc5 Bxc5 12. O-O Bb7 13. Qe2 Be7 {Black
could even Castle at once as the variation 13...O-O 14.e5 Bxf3
15.exf3 Nd5 16.Nxc5 Nxc5 17.Bxh7+ Kxh7 18.Qc2+ Kg8 19.Qxc5 Qh4
20.Qc2 f5; etc. was certainly not to his disadvantage.}
14. Rd1 Qa5 {This is more convincing than Lasker's stratagem
in a similar position in the first round (after ...O-O; Bg5),
viz., ...h6 followed by ...Nh5.} 15. b3 O-O 16. Bg5 Rfd8
17. Nb2 Nc5 {The simplest; If now 18.Nc4 Qc7 19.e5 Nxd3 and if
exf6 gxf6; etc. with a good game.} 18. e5 Nxd3 {Definitely
eliminating any danger; if 19.exf6 then 19...Nxb2 (A) 20.Qxb2
Bxf3 21.Rxd1+ exd8; or (B) 20.exf6 Rxd1+ 21.Rxd1 Nxd1 winning
in either case.} 19. Rxd3 Rxd3 20. Nxd3 Nd5 21. Bxe7 Nxe7
22. Nf4 Rd8 {Black had some slight advantages in the middle
game owing to his well placed Bishop; but the text-move which
allows the opponent to exchange Rooks facilitates White's
task. A good move was 22...Rc8 threatening ...Bxf3
eventually.} 23. Rd1 Nd5 24. Nxd5 {The game has some
theoretical value.} 1/2-1/2
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Post Mon Mar 07, 2011 8:49 am

Re: games annotated by alekhine

Game 20
[Event "Nottingham"]
[Site "Nottingham"]
[Date "1936.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Samuel Reshevsky"]
[Black "Milan Vidmar"]
[ECO "D27"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "51"]

1. d4 {Notes by Alekhine} d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 e6
5. Bd3 {Permitting Black to enter into a variation of the
Queen's Gambit accepted instead of adopting the more usual 5
Nc3 Nbd7, etc., leading to the Meran defence.} dxc4 6. Bxc4 c5
7. O-O a6 8. Nc3 b5 9. Bb3 Bb7 10. Qe2 Nc6 {? After White has
placed his bishop at b3 (instead of d3, as in the game
Lasker-Reshevsky, Nottinham, 1936) it would not be advisable
for Black to exchange pawns in the center, as in that case
White's pressure against e6 and f7 would become
dangerous. Much better than the text move was 10...Nbd7 not
allowing White's d-pawn to advance with gain of tempo, and
keeping the balance of the position.} 11. Rd1 Qb6 12. d5 {! A
well-known manoeuver in positions of this kind {see
Opocensky-Rubinstein, Marienbad 1933-4) which in this
particular case is exceptionally strong, as Black is not yet
able to castle.} exd5 {? The decisive mistake. A much better
fighting chance was 12...Na5 13 e4 (13 dxe6 fxe6, etc.) Nxb3
14 axb3 b4 15 Na4 Qb5.} 13. e4 {After this Black has no
satisfactory defence. If 13...d4 then 14 e5! Ng4 15 Nxd5 Qd8
16 Bf4 with the double threat 17 e6 or 17 Nf6+, the attack
bei9ng overwhelming.} dxe4 14. Nxe4 Nxe4 15. Qxe4+ Be7 {A
pretty variation would occur after 15...Ne7 16 Ne5! c4 17
Nxc4! bxc4 18 Ba4+ Bc6 19 Rd6 Rc8 20 Bg5 f6 21 Re1 with a
winning position.} 16. Bd5 Rd8 17. Bg5 Rxd5 {After ...f6 18
Bf4 Black, with his king in the middle, would be helpless
against the numerous threats.} 18. Rxd5 O-O 19. Rd7 {! Without
this move White would still have some technical difficulties,
but now things are easy.} Bd8 20. Rc1 {? Not the best,
although good enough. Immediately decisive was 20 b4! (cxb4 21
Be3, etc.) } Bc7 21. Qe3 Nb8 22. Re7 Bxf3 23. Qxf3 h6 {In
consequence of White's 20th move Black was in a position to
make a longer resistance by playing here 20...Nc6.} 24. Bf4
Bd6 {? Another blunder. But Black's game was already perfectly
hopeless.} 25. Rb7 Qd8 26. Rd1 1-0
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