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games annotated by alekhine

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stuart41088

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Post Fri Mar 11, 2011 1:56 pm

Re: games annotated by alekhine

Game 31
[Event "Nottingham"]
[Site "Nottingham"]
[Date "1936.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Savielly Tartakower"]
[Black "Milan Vidmar"]
[ECO "A02"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "31"]

1. f4 {Notes by Alekhine} d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. e3 Bg4 {This
development of the queen bishop is not very promising, as
black will not be able to avoid the exchange. More usual-just
the same as for White against the Dutch Defence- the king's
fianchetto.} 4. c4 e6 5. Nc3 Nbd7 {Black renounces the
opportunity to exert pressure against d4 and so relieves his
adversary of any possible worries. He should play 5...c5 and
if 6 cxd5 exd5 7 Bb5+ then Nbd7 (or even Nc3) 8 O-O Bd6, etc.,
with better prospects than he has in the actual game.} 6. cxd5
exd5 7. Be2 c6 8. O-O Bxf3 {To prevent d4 followed by Ne5. But
White has now the pair of bishops.} 9. Bxf3 Bb4 10. Qc2 O-O
11. b3 Qe7 12. Na4 {At this point, or even before, White
should have played a3, to preserve his two bishops. After the
text move the position becomes perfectly even, and neither of
the performers seems to enjoy further play.} Ba3 13. Bxa3 Qxa3
14. Rac1 Rfe8 15. Nc3 Rad8 16. Ne2 1/2-1/2
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stuart41088

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Post Fri Mar 11, 2011 1:57 pm

Re: games annotated by alekhine

Game 32
[Event "Nottingham"]
[Site "Nottingham"]
[Date "1936.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Theodore Tylor"]
[Black "Milan Vidmar"]
[ECO "C49"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "133"]

1. e4 {Notes by Alekhine} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bb5 Bb4
5. O-O O-O 6. d3 Bxc3 {If Black wants to play for a win, he
would do better with first 6...d6. Now White could by
exchanging on his eight move obtain a symmetrical position,
with bishops of opposite colors, and would have no difficulty
in drawing.} 7. bxc3 d6 8. Re1 Qe7 9. Qe2 {Probably with the
object of answering Bg4 with 10 h3 Bh5 11 Qe3. Black's next
move leads to a position known as the Metger Defence., in
which both players hold trumps in their hands- White his two
bishops, Black the sounder pawn position.} Nd8 10. d4 c5
11. Bd3 Kh8 {Black's plan must be to try to induce his
opponent to play d4, when he will be able to develop an
initiative on the king side. He could perhaps attain that
object more quickly by 11...Bg4 but rigidly determined to keep
his bishop.} 12. h3 Ng8 13. Bb2 Ne6 14. g3 f6 15. Kg2 Bd7
16. d5 {This looks rather inconsequent after his attempt (on
his 13th move) to protect d4. But a further delay would be
useless, as Black by ...Rac8, for instance, would sooner or
later force a clearance of the position in the center.} Ng5
17. Nxg5 fxg5 18. Bc1 {Here and in what follows White works up
the right defensive position.} Rf7 19. Be3 Raf8 20. Rh1 Qd8
{The object of this is not quite clear. He could instead play
immediately h6 with Nf6 to follow.} 21. c4 h6 22. Qd2 Nf6
23. Raf1 Nh5 24. f3 Rf6 {! This move will cause the opponent
some difficulty.} 25. h4 {? Very tempting (if in reply g4,
then f4!) but not the best. The only eventual threat from
Black could be met, for instance by 25 Qe1 after there was no
immediate danger for White.} gxh4 26. Rxh4 Nf4+ {? Losing a
pawn without compensation, instead of which he could get an
advantage by 26...Nxg3 27 Kxg3 (27 Bxh6 Nxf1 28 Bg5+ Kg8 29
Bxf1 Rg6) Rg6+ 28 Rg4 Rxf3+ 29 Rxf3 Bxg4!, etc.} 27. Bxf4 exf4
28. Rxf4 g5 29. Rxf6 Qxf6 30. Qd1 {Or immediately 30 f4} Kg8
31. f4 gxf4 32. Rxf4 Qg7 33. Rxf8+ {? The right move was 33
Qf3 with the threat of 34 Rxf8+ Qxf8 35 Qf4.} Kxf8 34. Qf3+
Ke7 35. Qf4 Qg5 36. Be2 Ba4 37. Bd3 Qh5 38. Qh4+ Qxh4 39. gxh4
Kf6 40. Kf3 Ke5 41. Ke3 Bd7 42. c3 Bg4 43. Bc2 Bh3 44. a3 Bf1
45. Bb3 a6 46. Ba2 Bh3 47. Bb1 Bg4 48. Bc2 Bh5 49. Ba4 Bg6
50. Bc2 Be8 51. Bd1 Bd7 52. Bc2 b6 53. Kf3 Bh3 54. Bd3 Bc8
55. Bb1 Bd7 56. Bc2 a5 57. Bd1 Be8 58. Ke3 Bf7 59. Be2 Bg8
60. Bf1 Bh7 61. Bg2 Bg6 62. Bf3 Bf7 63. Be2 Be8 64. Bd1 Bd7
65. Kf3 Bc8 66. Be2 Ba6 67. Ke3 1/2-1/2
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stuart41088

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Post Fri Mar 11, 2011 1:59 pm

Re: games annotated by alekhine

Game 33
[Event "Nottingham"]
[Site "Nottingham"]
[Date "1936.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Theodore Tylor"]
[Black "George Alan Thomas"]
[ECO "C50"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "58"]

1. e4 {Notes by Alekhine} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Be7 {If Black
does not intend to develop the bishop at c5 or b4 but to play
d6 it is better to make that move first. He would then have
the option in certain cases of developing the B in
fianchetto.} 4. d4 d6 5. h3 {Hardly necessary at the moment,
but will be useful later to keep Blaxck's minor pieces off
g4. 5 Nc3 Bg4 6 h3 occurred in Alekhine vs. Breyer, Mannheim,
1914.} Nf6 6. Nc3 a6 {This move would prove rather harmless if
Whitereplied simply 7 a3. As it happens, however, it leads to
an exchange which facilitates the defence.} 7. Be3 b5 8. Bd5
{Simplest as he has to consider two possibilities - 8...b4,
and 8...exd4 9 B or Nxd4 Nxd4 10 B or Nxd4 c5.} Nxd5 9. Nxd5
O-O 10. O-O Bb7 {An indirect protection of d5, in order to
prepare for f5. White prevents this project by his next move.}
11. Qd3 exd4 12. Bxd4 Nxd4 13. Nxd4 {The famous "two bishops"
will in this instance be perfectly useless, as one of them
will be necessarily be exchanged off in a very few moves.} Bf6
14. c3 Re8 15. a4 Bxd4 16. cxd4 {Not of course 16 Qxd4 on
account of c6 followed by c5.} c6 {Too optimistic. In the
ensuing blockade the superiority of the knight over the bishop
will become apparent. Much safer was 16...Bxd5 17 exd5 bxa4 18
Rxa4 Qb8 with a rather easy draw in the near future.} 17. Ne3
c5 18. d5 Qd7 19. f3 f6 20. b3 {White's plan is obvious; he
intends to free the c4 square for the knight.} Reb8 21. Rf2
Bc8 22. Rfa2 bxa4 {A sad necessity, as Bb7 would be worse, on
account of 23 axb5 axb5 24 Ra5, etc.} 23. Rxa4 Rb5 24. Nc4
Rab8 25. R4a3 Qc7 26. Qe3 Bb7 27. Qf4 Rd8 28. Kh2 Qd7 29. g4
{This is somewhat premature, and would be more effective after
29 Na5 Ba8. But even now White's prospects in the middle and
end game are superior, and he should not have stopped playing
after his opponent's next move.} Bc8 1/2-1/2
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stuart41088

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Post Fri Mar 11, 2011 2:01 pm

Re: games annotated by alekhine

Game 34
[Event "Nottingham"]
[Site "Nottingham"]
[Date "1936.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "George Alan Thomas"]
[Black "Jose Raul Capablanca"]
[ECO "C73"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "74"]

1. e4 {Notes by Alekhine} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 d6
5. Bxc6+ bxc6 6. d4 f6 {I think that this, a logical sequence
to Black's 4th move, is one of the most promising defences
against the Lopez, in which the chances of the two sides may
be considered about even. An interestin idea instead of
White's 5th move is 5 c4.} 7. Be3 {With the object of
answering g6 with 8 Qd2 followed eventually with Bh6. But
Black has a much easier line of development.} Ne7 8. Nc3 Ng6
9. Qd2 {If 9 h4 then simply exd4 followed by Ne5. The knight
would not be disloged from its central square by f4 as the g4
square would remain weak. But 9 Qe2 offered better prospects
than the text move.} Be6 {With the obvious intention of
playing d5.} 10. b3 {? this can be considered in a higher
sense as the losing move, although White need not actually
lose material after it. The emancipating 10...d5 should be
prevented by 10 Rd1 after which the real fight would begin.}
d5 {!} 11. O-O {Giving up at least a pawn, without the
slightest compensation. This could be avoided by 11 exd5 cxd5
12 Na4 e4 13 Ng1 but White's position would remain bad
enough.} dxe4 12. Nxe4 Bd5 13. Ng3 {The knight cannot be
protected on account of 13...f5, etc.} Bxf3 14. gxf3 Nh4 {!
Securing a decisive material advantage as 15 Qe2 would be met
by Qd5 16 Ne4 Qe6! ( less convincing would be 16...exd4 17
Nxf6+ gxf6 18 Bg5+) and ....Qh3. The rest of the game is
merely a matter of technique.} 15. Qd3 Nxf3+ 16. Kh1 Nxd4
17. Qe4 Qd5 {By trying to keep the two extra pawns Black will
eventually meet with difficulties.} 18. Qxd5 cxd5 19. Bxd4
exd4 20. Rad1 Bc5 {If ...c5 White would also win a pawn by 21
c3, etc.} 21. Nf5 Kf7 22. Nxd4 Rhe8 {Besides his material
superiority Black has also the better position - the only open
file, bishop vs. knight, and a more active king.} 23. c3 Re5
24. Rd3 Rae8 25. a4 {? This creates a new weakness in the
b-file, which Black exploits in a very convincing manner. A
longer resistance was possible after 25 Kg2.} Bxd4 26. Rxd4
{26 cxd4 Re1 27 Kg2 Rxf1 28 Kxf1 Ke7 29 Rc3 Kd6 30 Rc5 Rb8 31
Ra5 Rb6 left White helpless.} c5 27. Rd2 Rb8 28. Rb1 a5
29. Kg2 Ke6 30. Rc2 Kd6 31. f3 g5 32. Kg3 h5 33. h4 {Otherwise
Black would win by c4 followed by Re3.} gxh4+ 34. Kxh4 Re3
35. Kg3 {35 Kxh5 Rg8 would put White's king in a mating net.}
c4 {! Winning another pawn.} 36. b4 axb4 37. cxb4 Rb3 {A
simple but instructive rook endgame.} 0-1
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stuart41088

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Post Fri Mar 11, 2011 2:02 pm

Re: games annotated by alekhine

Game 35
[Event "Nottingham"]
[Site "Nottingham"]
[Date "1936.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Theodore Tylor"]
[Black "William Winter"]
[ECO "B72"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "62"]

1. e4 {Notes by Alekhine} c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6
5. Nc3 g6 6. Be2 Bg7 7. Be3 Nc6 8. Nb3 a5 {This attempt
(instead of Botvinnik's Be6) gives the game a peculiar
charachter, but hardly to Black's benefit. In fact, he obtains
only a shade of attack on the queen side and yiels in return
to White the full control of the important square b5. White
plays the next part of the game with perfect judgement.}
9. O-O a4 10. Nd4 O-O 11. Ndb5 Be6 12. Qd2 Na5 13. b3 {This
meets the threats in the simplest way, and Black's knight will
soon have to return after a fruitless trip.} axb3 14. axb3 Qd7
{Slightly more promising was the delaying of the following
exchange by 14...Re8.} 15. Bh6 Nc6 16. Bxg7 Kxg7 17. Rad1 Ng8
18. f4 {A misjudgement, since White has no real prospects of a
K side attack. His chances are in the center, and on the other
side of the board. He should therefore play at once 18 Nd5
Bxd5 19 exd5 Nd8 20 c4 with an obvious positional
advantage. The move selected only weakens the central
squares.} f6 19. Nd5 Bxd5 20. exd5 Nd8 21. Nd4 {And even here
the simplest 21 c4 was also the best.} Nh6 22. Bd3 Qc7
{Intending to profit by the comparative weakness of the Black
squares in his opponent's position. White's next move, giving
up command of e5 makes the task still easier.} 23. f5 Qc5
24. Be4 Nhf7 25. Rf3 {White realises that his position does
not know look promising, and takes the first opportunity to
force a perpetual check.} Ne5 26. Rg3 g5 27. h4 h6 28. hxg5
hxg5 29. Rxg5+ {!} fxg5 30. Qxg5+ Kf7 31. Qh5+ Kg7 1/2-1/2
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ankurst

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Joined: Mon Feb 28, 2011 11:21 pm

Post Sat Apr 16, 2011 12:21 pm

Re: games annotated by alekhine

Game 36
[Event "Nottingham"]
[Site "Nottingham"]
[Date "1936.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Samuel Reshevsky"]
[Black "William Winter"]
[ECO "D19"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "62"]

1. d4 {Notes by Alekhine} d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc4
5. a4 Bf5 6. e3 e6 7. Bxc4 Bb4 8. O-O O-O 9. Qe2 Ne4 {As in
the other games in this tournament this move proves to be
quite sufficient to equalise (see Lasker-Capablanca and
Fine-Capablanca).} 10. Nxe4 Bxe4 11. Nd2 Bg6 12. Nb3 Nd7
13. Bd2 {Leads to a further simplification (see Black's 14th
move). But as Black's pieces are well developed and he has no
weaknesses, there is no reason for White to complicate
matters, for instance by Rd1.} Bxd2 14. Qxd2 e5 15. a5 exd4
16. exd4 {Comparatively better than 16.Qxd4 Qe7; followed by
...Rd8 after which Black's Pawn majority on the Q-side could
become an important faqctor in the endgame.} Nf6 17. Qf4 Nd5
18. Qg3 Qf6 {Showing that he is satisfied with a
draw. Otherwise 18...Re8 and if 19.Re1 then ...Rxe1+ 20.Rxe1
b6, in order to limit the action of the White Knight, was
worth considering.} 19. Bxd5 cxd5 20. Rfc1 Rfc8 21. Qe5
{Hoping, in vain, to get the strong square d4 for the Knight
after the exchange.} Qxe5 22. dxe5 Rc4 {An exactly caculated
move which destroys White's last winning hope. If after
23.Rxc4 dxc4 White should play 24.Nc5 he would even get into
some trouble. 24...Rd8 25.Nxb7 Rd2 26.Nd6 Bd3 followed by
...Rxb2.} 23. Rxc4 dxc4 24. Nd2 Bd3 25. Ra4 Rc8 26. Rb4 c3
{The simplest} 27. bxc3 Rxc3 28. f4 Ba6 29. Rd4 Kf8 30. Ne4
Ra3 31. Rd5 {Black can now play for instance 31...Ra4 32.Nc5
Rxf4 33.Nxa6 bxa6 34.Rd6 Rc4 35.Rxa6 Rc7 etc.} 1/2-1/2
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ankurst

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Posts: 9

Joined: Mon Feb 28, 2011 11:21 pm

Post Sat Apr 16, 2011 12:24 pm

Re: games annotated by alekhine

Game 37
[Event "Nottingham"]
[Site "Nottingham"]
[Date "1936.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Reuben Fine"]
[Black "Jose Raul Capablanca"]
[ECO "D19"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "40"]

1. d4 {Notes by Alekhine} d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc4
5. a4 Bf5 6. e3 e6 7. Bxc4 Bb4 8. O-O O-O 9. Qe2 Ne4 10. Nxe4
Bxe4 11. Rd1 Nd7 12. Bd2 {This seems to give Black even less
trouble than 12 Bd3, played by Dr. Lasker in the sixth round,
as he can exchange by force almost all the minor pieces.} Bxf3
13. Qxf3 Qa5 14. Qe2 Bxd2 15. Qxd2 Qxd2 16. Rxd2 a5 17. g3 Nb6
18. Bb3 Rfd8 19. Rc2 Nd5 20. Bxd5 Rxd5 {A delightful game for
the annotator. I think it is the only one in this connection
which does not even deserve a diagram.} 1/2-1/2
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ankurst

Pawn

Posts: 9

Joined: Mon Feb 28, 2011 11:21 pm

Post Sat Apr 16, 2011 12:28 pm

Re: games annotated by alekhine

Game 38
[Event "Nottingham"]
[Site "Nottingham"]
[Date "1936.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Max Euwe"]
[Black "Savielly Tartakower"]
[ECO "D07"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "79"]

1. d4 {Notes by Alekhine} d5 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nc3 e5 {? A weak
continuation, which has not even the advantage of novelty. If
Dr. Tartakower thought to take his opponent by surprise he was
mistaken, as Dr. Euwe knew the variation - if not before -
from his game with Colle, Hastings, 1930-31, in which there
followed 4 cxd5 Nxd4 5 e3 Nf5 6 Nf3 Bd6 7 e4 Nfe7.} 4. cxd5
Nxd4 5. e3 Nf5 6. e4 Nd6 7. Nf3 Bg4 {Comparatively better was
f6 at once as the White Q will be extremely well placed at
b3.} 8. Qa4+ Bd7 9. Qb3 f6 10. Be3 {White has now a welcome
object of attack in Black's c-pawn.} Ne7 11. Rc1 Nec8 {Another
possible plan was c6 followed by g6 and Bg7. But White would
have no difficulty in any case in maintaining his advantage in
space.} 12. Bd3 Be7 13. O-O O-O 14. Nb5 {Aiming at the
possession of two bishops, in an anticipation of a long
positional struggle.} Bxb5 15. Bxb5 Nxb5 {? I am almost
inclined to think that Dr. Tartakower simply overlooked the
discovered check! Otherwise the move is hardly to be
explained, as the immediate disastrous consequences are only
too obvious. The right course was 15...Nf7 followed by Ncd6
with possibilities of a steady fefence.} 16. d6+ Rf7 17. dxe7
Qd7 {After 17...Qe8 18 a4 Nbd6 19 Rxc7 Nxe7 20 Bc5 White has
an easy win.} 18. Rfd1 Ncd6 19. a4 Nd4 20. Bxd4 exd4 21. e5 {!
Winning the exchange, with the better position.} fxe5 22. Nxe5
Qxe7 23. Nxf7 Nxf7 24. Qxb7 Rd8 25. Rxc7 Qe6 26. Re7 Qf6
27. Qd7 Rf8 28. Re8 {After 28 Rxd4 Black (in spite of his
optimism) would probably have resigned.} Nd6 29. Rxf8+ Kxf8
30. Rd3 Qe5 31. Kf1 h5 32. Qxa7 Nf5 33. Qd7 g6 34. Rb3 Qf4
35. g3 Qc1+ 36. Kg2 Ne3+ 37. Kh3 Qf1+ 38. Kh4 Nf5+ 39. Kg5
Qc1+ 40. Kf6 1-0
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ankurst

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Posts: 9

Joined: Mon Feb 28, 2011 11:21 pm

Post Sat Apr 16, 2011 12:31 pm

Re: games annotated by alekhine

Game 39
[Event "Nottingham"]
[Site "Nottingham"]
[Date "1936.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Mikhail Botvinnik"]
[Black "Milan Vidmar"]
[ECO "D60"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "47"]

1. c4 {Notes by Alekhine} e6 2. Nf3 d5 3. d4 Nf6 4. Nc3 Be7
5. Bg5 O-O 6. e3 Nbd7 7. Bd3 {The variations starting with 7
Rc1 have been so much analysed of recent years that the
text-move, though it allows the immediate ...c5, offers better
fighting chances.} c5 8. O-O cxd4 {As the Black pieces are not
developed so as to attack the isolated d-pawn, the better
policy here is the usual line 8...dxc4 9 Bxc4 a6 10 a4 Re8.}
9. exd4 dxc4 10. Bxc4 Nb6 11. Bb3 Bd7 {The beginning of a
risky plan, in view of White's prospects of a K side
attack. The half-pinning of his king's knight, which seems so
harmless at the moment, will in a few moves become extremely
disagreeable for Black. It was wiser therefore to clear the
situation at once by 11...Nfd5 without much danger in the near
future.} 12. Qd3 {! Intending, if 12...Nfd5; 13 Bc2.} Nbd5
13. Ne5 Bc6 14. Rad1 Nb4 {? A second mistake, after which
White's attack becomes tremendously strong. A lesser evil was
...Rc8 in order to answer 15 Qh3 with ...Nxc3 16 bxc3 Be4.}
15. Qh3 Bd5 {This does not solve the problem of the defence,
as White preserves his powerful king's bishop.} 16. Nxd5 Nbxd5
17. f4 {!} Rc8 {Or ...g6 18 Bh6 Re8 19 g4, etc.} 18. f5 exf5
19. Rxf5 Qd6 {? Losing immediately. The only move was ...Rc7,
after which White would increase his pressure against f7 by 20
Rdf1 followed eventually by Qh4 with decisive advantage.}
20. Nxf7 {! Simple and neat. Black cannot avoid serious
material loss.} Rxf7 21. Bxf6 Bxf6 22. Rxd5 {Much stronger
than 22 Bxd5.} Qc6 {Or 22...Bxd4+ 23 Kh1.} 23. Rd6 Qe8 24. Rd7
1-0
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ankurst

Pawn

Posts: 9

Joined: Mon Feb 28, 2011 11:21 pm

Post Sat Apr 16, 2011 12:32 pm

Re: games annotated by alekhine

Game 40
[Event "Nottingham"]
[Site "Nottingham"]
[Date "1936.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "C H Alexander"]
[Black "Theodore Tylor"]
[ECO "B14"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "48"]

1. c4 {Notes by Alekhine} c6 2. e4 d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. d4 Nf6
5. Nc3 Nc6 6. Nf3 e6 {It is somehat better to play this on the
sixth move, in order to be able to answer c5 with b6. After
the text move the advance of the c-pawn would offer White
excellent prospects.} 7. Bd3 {? Instead ofg which White loses
an important tempo, and allows his adversary to enter into a
quiet variation of the Queen's Gambit Accepted.} dxc4 8. Bxc4
a6 9. O-O Be7 10. Bf4 O-O 11. a3 {Preparing d5 which at this
moment would be premature, on account of the answer 11...Na5.}
b5 12. d5 exd5 {It is obvious that after 12...bxc4 13 dxc6
White's c-pawn would be stronger than Black's. Also that
12...Na5 13 Bxb5 followed by 14 d6 would be to White's
advantage.} 13. Bxd5 Bb7 14. b4 {If this move is made in order
to prevent Na5, it fails to attain its object. In fact, Black
could make the knight's move, which was in the circumstances
his simplest course. E.g., 14...Na5 15 Bxf7+ Rxf7 16 bxa5 Qxa5
17 Qb3 Bxf3 followed by Raf8.}h6 {? An important loss of
time. If he did not mean to play Na5 he should continue
14...Nxd5 15 Nxd5 Bd6 with a feasible defence.} 15. Re1 Nxd5
{? A mistake. Necessary first was 15...Rc8.} 16. Nxd5 Bg5
{Strangely enough, there is no longer a defence against the
threats of Nxe7+, Bc7, or Nc7.} 17. Bc7 Qc8 18. Nxg5 hxg5
19. Rc1 {? The game could easily have been won by 19 Qh5! If
in reply ...Qc5 then 20 Re5! Qg6 21 Rxg5 Qxh5 22 Nf6+ followed
by 23 Rxh5 mate. Or if 19...f6 then 20 Bd6 Rf7 (Rd8 21 Nb6
winning the exchange) 21 Nb6 Qd8 22 Bc5 followed by Rad1 when
black would lose through want of space.} Re8 {Now the
immediate danger is over. If 20 Rxe8+ Qxe8 21 Nb6 then Ra7 22
Qd2 f6 23 Re1 Qf7, etc.} 20. Qd3 {Still White should adopt the
variation just mentioned. After the careless move in the text
Black can force a drawn position in a few moves.} Qg4 21. Qg3
Qxg3 22. hxg3 Ne5 23. Rxe5 Rxe5 24. Bxe5 Bxd5 1/2-1/2
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